Why I can't legally be named "NJWEEDMAN.COM" (true story)

Discussion in 'Real Life Stories' started by NJWEEDMAN, Apr 13, 2002.

  1. While I was in prison I motioned the courts to change my name to NJWEEDMAN.COM . I really was doing this to get media attention while in prison. I wanted people to go to my website and read my POLITICAL-PRISONER rant and see I was in prison UNCONSTITUTIONALLY.
    (page is being updated now)
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    SEE THE FOLLOWING NEWS ACCOUNTS

    Trentonian 2/6/2002

    The saga of Ed "NJ Weedman" Forchion continues to unfold like a poorly rolled joint.

    Forchion, who currently is sitting in Riverfront State Prison on a pot charge, believes marijuana should be legal and has taken numerous steps in his quixotic quest.

    He has run for congress and Burlington County freeholder, getting thousands of votes both times. He has lit up joints in courts, in congressional offices, and most famously, in the State Senate chambers.

    He has been the subject of newspaper and magazine articles locally, nationally and internationally.

    He has written a book about his life as well as a series of comic books based on his adventures as the "NJ Weedman."

    And he's sitting in jail because he was convicted of being in possession of 25 pounds of pot in1997, pot that he contends was meant for ill people and for members of the Rastafarian religion.

    His latest battle with the powers that be centers on his quest to change his legal name-- to NJWEEDMAN.COM.

    The Camden County Prosecutor's office isn't thrilled with the prospect.

    In a three-page brief, Assistant Prosecutor Kathleen Higgins argues against Forchion's plan.

    "The petitioner's motive is clearly criminal in that its purpose is clearly to enhance his business of selling marijuana," she writes. "This is clearly an unworthy motive of a criminal purpose, and is offensive to the public."

    But Forchion insists it's only a gimmick to sell books.

    NJWEEDMAN.COM is his "professional name," said Forchion, which he intends to use as an "advertising gimmick for my books, not as a criminal venture."

    Higgins claims it's an advertising gimmick to sell marijuana.

    The prosecutor also believes Forchion would be setting a bad precedent.

    "Allowing the petitioner to change his name would open the floodgates to all drug dealers and other criminals to change their names to professional criminal-type names," she wrote.

    No decision has been made by the courts concerning Forchion's name change as of yet.

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    TRENTONIAN 2/15/2002

    Ed Forchion's bid to legally change his name to NJWEEDMAN.COM was turned down by a Camden County judge yesterday.

    "It was denied," said Judge M. Allan Vogelson.

    He would not further discuss the case, and calls to Camden County Assistant Prosecutor Kathleen Higgins, who argued against the name change, were not returned.

    And according to Dr. Steve Fenichel, an Absecon physician, Forchion was not at the hearing, despite being promised Thursday night that he would be allowed to attend.

    "He was told he was going to be picked up and taken there," said Fenichel, who was to serve as a medical expert in Forchion's last trial. "I talked to him today and that was not the case."

    Forchion, who is currently sitting in Riverfront State Prison on a pot charge, is a marijuana crusader who has run for congress and Burlington County freeholder, getting thousands of votes both times.

    He has also smoked pot in courts, in congressional offices, and most famously, in the state Senate chambers in an effort to draw attention to his cause.

    He has also written a book and a series of comic books on his life, where he refers to himself as the "NJ Weedman."

    According to Forchion, that is his "professional name," and he wanted to change it as an "advertising gimmick for my books, not as a criminal venture."

    In a three-page brief sent to Vogelson before yesterday's hearing, Assistant Prosecutor Higgins argued against Forchion's plan.

    "The petitioner's motive is clearly criminal in that its purpose is clearly to enhance his business of selling marijuana," she writes. "This is clearly an unworthy motive, a criminal purpose and is offensive to the public."

    Higgins then supposed that Forchion would be setting a bad precedent.

    "Allowing petitioner to change his name would open the floodgates to all drug dealers and other criminals to change their names to professional criminal type names," she wrote.

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    COURIER POST of Cherry Hill N.J.
    EDITORIAL
    Tuesday, February 19, 2002

    Why can't a citizen change his own name?

    Let Ed Forchion be `NJWeedman.com.'

    People should be called whatever they want. Cassius Clay became Muhammad Ali. Prince changed his name to a symbol. And if someone wants to twist the trusted name of Puff Daddy into P. Diddy, well, he's a grown man. Chronologically, anyway.

    So why can't Robert Edward Forchion Jr. become "NJWeedman. com"?

    A colorful local character who has run for local and national office on the legalize-marijuana platform, Forchion already is known as "Weedman." But his request to change his name legally to NJWeedman.com was struck down by a Superior Court judge, after a prosecuting attorney argued Forchion was doing this in order to gain publicity and sell marijuana.

    Granted, Forchion actively seeks publicity. He helped bolster that reputation by sending the attorney - an assistant Camden County prosecutor - a Valentine with a picture of a heart and a marijuana plant, and a message thanking her for opposing the name change and gaining him more attention.

    But what's wrong with wanting publicity? Did the actor Paul Reubens call himself "Pee Wee Herman" as part of a private, spiritual quest? Let's hope not. More likely, he was trying to sell himself.

    As for the charge that the name would help Forchion sell pot, attracting attention to his illegal activities seems to be the least of his problems. He's already in jail. When he gets out, police probably will be keeping an eye on him. How many people who've heard of Forchion at all don't know he likes marijuana?

    Since everyone is calling him Weedman anyway, we might as well just let him put it on his driver's license. It'll cut down on confusion and, if nothing else, give cops a hint of what they're dealing with if they pull him over.
     
  2. 'WEEDMAN' SEEKS ASYLUM FROM CUBA

    TRENTON ( AP ) -- He tried to change the system by civil disobedience and running for elected office. Now the candidate who campaigned as "NJ Weedman" says he wants asylum.

    Instead of facing a possible prison sentence in New Jersey, Edward Forchion is in Canada hoping the Cuban Embassy will take him in.

    "I can't just walk into jail," Forchion told a newspaper Thursday.

    Forchion arrived in Ottawa on Wednesday and met with officials at the Cuban Embassy. His verbal request for asylum was denied and he was asked to submit one in writing, Forchion said.

    "I didn't hurt anybody. I should be allowed to smoke," he said.

    Authorities alleged Forchion was part of a drug ring that had 25 pounds of marijuana shipped to a business in the Bellmawr Industrial Park in Camden County.

    In October 1998, Forchion was indicted on charges of conspiracy and possession with intent to distribute.

    He was on the ballot at the time as the "legalize marijuana party" candidate looking to replace Rep. Robert E. Andrews, D-Haddon Heights.

    Forchion pleaded guilty in state Superior Court to conspiracy and possession. With a hearing set for Dec. 1, he faced up to 10 years in state prison.

    He has since filed a motion seeking to retract that guilty plea.

    Arrests and political campaigns continued.

    In March, Forchion appeared at the State House for an Assembly session wearing a black and white striped prisoner's costume.

    On the floor of the Assembly chambers, Forchion allegedly smoked marijuana. He was escorted out by state troopers and arrested.

    He said it was an act of civil disobedience to highlight what he said is the state's discrimination against marijuana users.

    Forchion ran again this year as a third-party opponent to Andrews. He also was on the ballot in Burlington County for a seat on the freeholder board.

    During a campaign news conference outside the courthouse in Mount Holly, Forchion again reportedly smoked marijuana. That appearance was ended by the Burlington County sheriff.

    If Forchion does not appear in court for his sentencing hearing, he would be considered a fugitive.

    "The prosecutor will move to revoke bail and begin proceedings to have any posted bail forfeited and to seek to have that defendant extradited," Camden County prosecutor's spokesman Greg Reinert told the newspaper.
     
  3. The New Jersey Weedman, Ed Forchion, fled to Canada to seek asylum at the Cuban Embassy in November of last year, but was denied. His bid for freedom came after Forchion accepted a deal with the New Jersey courts on charges that he trafficked in 25 pounds of marijuana. Ed Forchion is a Rastafarian who uses cannabis as a sacrament.

    He later regretted the deal. During the trial, said Forchion, two of the jurors broke down crying and one dismissed herself from the case.

    "I should have been the perfect candidate to challenge this law," Forchion told the press afterward. Forchion then petitioned the courts to allow him to change his plea, but was denied. That's when he skipped town for a sojourn north of the US border.

    After being denied asylum, Forchion returned to New Jersey where he was sentenced to 10 years in prison on December 1 of last year. He is now appealing.

    "His appeal is on the grounds of jury nullification and the fact that the marijuana laws are void for vagueness," write Reverends Michael and Walter in a press release. "In other words, no reasonable and probable grounds violates the constitution."
     
  4. njweedman.com
     
  5. Interesting and a cool story. =)

    thanks

    Z
     

  6. It wouldve been nice to see NJWeedman on the ballot, but GMV anyway Ed! :smoke:
     
  7. That's awesome, I would vote for you. :smoking:
     
  8. you used to post on bluelight right>?
     

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