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Thinking about Job Corp

Discussion in 'General' started by Tokinit, May 10, 2010.

  1. Right. There is no certification state-wide that requires an associates degree in any state to fix fucked-up shitters. But alas, in order to be properly trained in most cases, that is how it's done: on the job training with a local chapter of a trade union in conjunction with classroom courses. IE, apprenticeship. For a random trade-based example: Construction Tending & Hazardous Material Abatement
    For sure. I know an HVAC who was trained by his dad, dropped out in the 9th grade. But he's asking how it's usually done, in most cases, without extraordinary circumstances. Namely, innate abilities and family ties. Most of the time, it's done via classroom education and on-the-job training.
    I think we're just mis-communicating. Whether or not a physical degree- be it associates or otherwise- is required, depends on circumstance. Ultimately in trades you just need a resume, as there is no degree requirement for any certs (and there often aren't even certs). The point is that you need an education, usually reinforced in a classroom, in order to be learned. Whether or not you get a certificate, a hand shake, or a sexy degree isn't the point I'm trying to make. That's just parsing.
    Also this. Relax, Brosepharian.
     
  2. Okay after you clarified everything I now agree with you :D. You are correct, in most circumstances, education in a traditional classroom is the only way to land a good career. Whether it be a degree, certification, or on the job training plus classroom teachings.

    There, now that we got the arguments out of the way everyone down to smoke a 40 minute blunt?:smoking:
     
  3. ^ I'd be down for sure if a detox drink would drop out of the sky right after :D

    Word, college is definitely not necessary but its extremely useful if you want a white collar career, which definitely isn't the only way to go.....But for OP's original question I think going to college would help and he should seek tutors or smoke a bowl before a test to calm himself.
     
  4. bringing up an old post...

    Job Corps.. unfortunately though it may have been a good idea back in the day, today judges are sending criminal 17 and 18 year olds there and there are tons of problems with this.

    Many of the 125 campuses are privately run, meaning the people who run them normally care less about actually teaching the kids and more about the money they are making.

    No, not all of them, but there are many.

    These two things have essentially turned these campuses into 'Reformatory schools', probably 60-70% of the kids at Job Corps were assigned to go there, by a judge or probation officer, or would be forced to go to Juvenile prison.

    It really depends on where you go, some of the more rural, smaller places are better than the huge or urban places (such as the places in Eastern Kentucky that house over 2000 kids).

    It's good for getting your GED if that's what you want... The pay is ridiculously low, $10-20 per week, which is taxed, and you usually are forced to buy supplies with that money. So don't expect to save much for the year or so you are there.


    Now... If you are poor.. or even live with someone else who doesn't make over $20,000 a year.. then you very likely will be eligible for a Pell Grant... these are free grants given to you by the government to go to school.

    Myself... I live with my mother who is on social security. She doesn't make a huge amount of money so I qualified for the full $5,500 pell grant plus about $2,200 in additional federal money... all money I don't have to pay back.

    The $7,700 I receive easily pays for all my books, tuition and other fees at the local community college ($3,400 per year), thus I actually get to keep the extra $4,000, which I've used to buy this nice laptop i'm on and to fix my car to continue going to school.

    If your family makes more than $100k a year.. the goverment expects them to pay for your education, or most of it. So essentially you wouldn't be eligible for these grants... the way around this.... Live with someone who doesn't have a lot of money... They figure your household/family's ability to pay for your education when figuring out how much you will get, if you don't live with your family or they don't make much, you get more.

    Most kids going to college can't really take advantage of this cause most of them have parents that make money, it's the few that live around the poverty line that can really take advantage of this.
     
  5. #25 clobster, Nov 24, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 24, 2011
    By the way.. that guy who claims you don't need to go to school either has a daddy that got him a job or has family getting him work.

    These days, you either know someone that will get you the job, or you have an education.

    That's the easiest way to land a good job...

    Most employers won't even look at your resume if they don't see some kind of degree on there.

    Example: My father who is a Maintenance Supervisor for ConAgra was instructed by his boss not to even call anyone who didn't have SOME degree. It didn't even matter if the job was a supervisor position and the potential employee had an associates degree in nursing, as long as they had a degree. Anyway...they passed up multiple guys who had held the same job at other companies just because they had no degree. That is just how it works these days.

    A word of advice... Even if you're not taking classes full time, being able to put on your Resume that you're actually in school is 100X better than not having anything on there. Even if you're taking just one class a week, you're still in college and that already looks better than the guys who come in with just a high school diploma.

    Oh yeah.. and as a former Air Traffic Controller apprentice at KRDG, don't think for a second you can find an ATC job without a college degree...unless perhaps you did it in the Air Force...even then they want a degree.

    The point is, those with a degree, even a 2 year associates degree are 20-30% more hirable (new word meaning 'to have the ability to be hired') than those without one.. and as you progress through your education that percentage gets higher and higher.

    It's not impossible to get a great job without an education, but it's HIGHLY unlikely.
     
  6. I went to two different JCor's, Earle C. Clements JCT in Morganfield Ky. Which SUCKED! But only cuz its a large campus (2nd largest) and there's nothing else around but a walmart and corn.

    Also alot of wannabe hard 'gangsta' types treat it like prison. Bunch of bullshit. The 2nd center I went to was smaller and was called Jacobs Creek Job Corp and was in Bristol Tn.

    By far my fav. Beautiful in the mountains and no corn. Lol

    I would be happy to correspond in PMS if you would like, but I highly recommend Job Corps if ur able to.

    But im telling you to go in clean, if you pass your 1st drug test then your basicly free to smoke. Unless u get caught then they will test you, if u fail u have 30days to get clean.

    If u fail the 1st test ur red flagged and in 30 days u get retested.

    Also weed prices SUCK, we would pay $10 for maybe a nic. Unless u got connects in town.

    Hit me up anytime man.

    Do it...
     
  7. [quote name='"clobster"']bringing up an old post...

    Job Corps.. unfortunately though it may have been a good idea back in the day, today judges are sending criminal 17 and 18 year olds there and there are tons of problems with this.

    Many of the 125 campuses are privately run, meaning the people who run them normally care less about actually teaching the kids and more about the money they are making.

    No, not all of them, but there are many.

    These two things have essentially turned these campuses into 'Reformatory schools', probably 60-70% of the kids at Job Corps were assigned to go there, by a judge or probation officer, or would be forced to go to Juvenile prison.

    It really depends on where you go, some of the more rural, smaller places are better than the huge or urban places (such as the places in Eastern Kentucky that house over 2000 kids).

    It's good for getting your GED if that's what you want... The pay is ridiculously low, $10-20 per week, which is taxed, and you usually are forced to buy supplies with that money. So don't expect to save much for the year or so you are there.

    Now... If you are poor.. or even live with someone else who doesn't make over $20,000 a year.. then you very likely will be eligible for a Pell Grant... these are free grants given to you by the government to go to school.

    Myself... I live with my mother who is on social security. She doesn't make a huge amount of money so I qualified for the full $5,500 pell grant plus about $2,200 in additional federal money... all money I don't have to pay back.

    The $7,700 I receive easily pays for all my books, tuition and other fees at the local community college ($3,400 per year), thus I actually get to keep the extra $4,000, which I've used to buy this nice laptop i'm on and to fix my car to continue going to school.

    If your family makes more than $100k a year.. the goverment expects them to pay for your education, or most of it. So essentially you wouldn't be eligible for these grants... the way around this.... Live with someone who doesn't have a lot of money... They figure your household/family's ability to pay for your education when figuring out how much you will get, if you don't live with your family or they don't make much, you get more.

    Most kids going to college can't really take advantage of this cause most of them have parents that make money, it's the few that live around the poverty line that can really take advantage of this.[/quote]

    And the pay is bullshit... $25 a week to start type of shit
     

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