How much should I expect per plant?

Discussion in 'Absolute Beginners' started by DutchX8, Jan 27, 2009.

  1. I'm moving down to Florida in the summer and I will definitely dedicate a room in my apartment to growing. As for seeds, i'm looking at Blue Cheese, Big Bud, Durban Poison, Super Silver Haze, Strawberry Cough, and White Russian. In all honesty I probably won't get all of those, but what I end up picking will be one of those names. I've heard Big Bud has a massive yield, has anyone grown that? How much do you think i'll get from it?

    And from what i've read in other growing forums, an experienced grower will get more out of their plant than a beginner. But if I do everything correctly, wouldn't I be able to get the same yields? Does anyone have any tips to get good yield?
     
  2. it is possible to grow like a pro the only difference between good growers and bad ones are they dont forget the process.
     
  3. ^I think there is a little bit more than that different between them. But your point is taken, good growers are patient, stick with what they know has worked before (unless they are purposely experimenting), don't skip steps or cut corners that can't be skipped or cut, and "listen" well to their plants.

    To the OP, no way to predict yield, there just are way too many variables, most of which are in your control. The range literally could be anywhere between a few grams and a pound, which I know isn't helpful but is the reality.

    I advise first-time growers that if they can bring a plant all the way to maturity without killing it and get an ounce of dried finished product they have hit a home run.
     
  4. I couldn't agree more. If you study, research, and work a game plan diligently, the rewards will slowly pay off. I've found that going in with high yields at the forefront of your mind set, something usually screws up and I'm disappointed. When I grow it by the book, things always work out better.
    It's the little things that seem to pay off big for me. In soil, use the biggest pots and best soils you can get away with. Less is more when it comes to nutes. ALWAYS know and check ph. Get fresh air to your grow space. When you shift to hydro, make sure your ppm and ph are regulated. When you focus more on keeping the environment for your plant at an optimum level, you'll be rewarded with bigger yields. One other point....I've found that keeping a daily written journal really pays off for me. I use a calendar-like book and note dates and times and ph/ppm readings, as well as waterings and reservoir changes....any little thing that comes up..and it can really pay off in future grows.
    Good luck
     
  5. Thanks for the helpful replies everyone. I won't be growing until this summer, so I plan on spending all the time between now and then just reading up on everything I can and try to educate myself before I start.

    Here's another question for you guys. Sometimes when I buy weed it's very dry and leafy, and sometimes it's very soft, almost like cotton (lol not really like cotton but that's the best comparison I can think of), and kind of squishy and sticky. Is there anything I can do to effect the "feel" of the bud? I want mine to be the soft type. Is it something to do with the drying process, or the growing?
     
  6. #6 abnormldood, Jan 28, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 28, 2009
    If you are patient and follow the correct drying and curing procedures it will always be of the best quality. Keep it in air tight mason jars to keep it fresh. Usually "street weed" you buy isn't properly prepared or maintained and that's why it can be dry and harsh tasting.
     

  7. completey true couldnt agree anymore can't tell you how many time's ive bought weed an its taste was bleak an ridic.
     

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