Zero Runoff in Coco??

Discussion in 'Coco Coir' started by ArizonaTHC, Apr 14, 2012.

  1. Started using a drip system recently and a 40 gal res. Using a daily watering and zero runoff.

    What is the best way to periodically flush the Coco (Sunshine Advanced #4 blend)?

    Currently I have been running about a gallon through each plant of 1tsp florakleen for 2 days about every 3 weeks. Is this suffice?

    I don't seem to have any nutrient issues but im always hearing about 20% runoff. I don't even have drip trays under my pots because I don't feed them that much.

    Thoughts?
     

  2. why would you not have run-off??? coco is made for run-off. 10-15% every time you feed. the reason for the run-off is to wash out the built up nutes, eliminating the need to flush. as a matter of fact, you don't want to flush in coco. all you're doing is washing out all the nutes. even in soil you want some run-off....
     
  3. ^^Exactly spot on....Even 30% runoff is more common
     
  4. I don't do a runoff. No trays under my pots. Runoff would flood room.
     

  5. it's very possible that you will encounter problems somewhere along the grow.
     

  6. Such as?
     

  7. a build up of nutrients, which will result in issues in the leaves. it could show as nutrient burn, or a ph imbalance, or both...
     
  8. I understand your point, but when you achieve runoff you are basically buffering the coco back to your desired nutrient ratios. If you never do that then all of the ratios and EC from the water/drip that you are putting in may stock pile certain nutes your plant may not of soaked up for various reasons (it didn't need P so it left more in the coco, the next feeding it still didn't want as much P as you gave it but now you have double the amount left over because the plant didn't eat it all up TWICE. So now your letting an unknown ratio and EC of nutes build up in the coco, and because you can not pinpoint which is in excess you could possibly start to get signs of lockout, that could look like a diffencey when really its just caused my an improper nutrient ratio.
     
  9. Fair enough.

    Let me ask you guys this. Do you think its necessary to constantly be recirculating a resevoir of nutes or do you think 2x a day for an hour is plenty of time to "stir"?
     
  10. As far as making sure the solution is mixed properly? Or if that would be sufficient time to oxygenate your solution?
     
  11. 2 hours of agitation, by a water pump (just like a fish tank), is plenty of time to rest and balance out.
     

  12. Thanks!

    Do you think airstones are really necessary in a resevoir that is feeding drain to waste?
     
  13. Absolutely not. I think Air Stones are bad news in reservoirs. They do very little to actually oxygenate the solution, and typically just raise the temperature of the solution and mess with the pH.

    Hence, water pump, like in an aquarium. You want to break the surface of the water. Like a water fall, for the best aeration of the solution.
     

  14. That would be tough to do consistently since my pump sits on the bottom of the res and is only out of the water when i run under 5 gallons in the rez
     
  15. I don't really get this. Are you saying that a plant can actually filter out specific nutrients it doesn't require? One would assume it absorbs everything dissolved in the water it uptakes not filters out specific elements resulting in a build up..

    Fully understand what you're saying just not sure how a plant could have the ability to do so. Someone wanna shed some light on exactly how they do this?
     
  16. The solution goes into the media and the plant up takes what it needs. It doesn't automatically absorb everything that's in the media.
     
  17. Tried running my rez without Airstones and got algae
     
  18. :confused: Because air kills algae?
     
  19. [quote name='"SCMC"']Absolutely not. I think Air Stones are bad news in reservoirs. They do very little to actually oxygenate the solution, and typically just raise the temperature of the solution and mess with the pH.

    Hence, water pump, like in anOr explaim aquarium. You want to break the surface of the water. Like a water fall, for the best aeration of the solution.[/quote]

    Scmc, could you site where you sourced this info? Or explain, water temp I understand (heated air) but ph issues I dont understand?

    As for the other comment Im pretty sure well oxygenated solution helps prevent algae growth
     
  20. [quote name='"TheGooey"']

    Scmc, could you site where you sourced this info? Or explain, water temp I understand (heated air) but ph issues I dont understand?

    As for the other comment Im pretty sure well oxygenated solution helps prevent algae growth[/quote]

    Just google it. There is quite a bit on the subject. Aquarium owners are particularly well versed on how to properly oxygenate their water for the fishes.

    The pH issues come from the other gases in the air that are passing through the solution, namely nitrogen and carbon dioxide. I experienced this for myself and searched for an answer a long time ago. I found the answer in an ACT thread using a venturi device to properly oxygenate their tea. Honestly, it isn't unbearable to manage, but it can be a little bit of a hassle when you are constantly adjusting the solution. To understand this concept you have to understand how pH works (free H+ and OH- ions) and how the ions interact with the bubbles of air passing through.

    In ponds aeration of the water provides an aerobic environment for bacteria which facilitates a greater amount of decomposition. This decomp process helps consume the nutrient food source before the algae am flourish.

    Check out this link on algae. http://www.gotalgae.com/aeration.htm

    It is not directly related to nutrient solution but it will still provide some insight.

    If you just want an answer on air stones... Email your nutrient company. The customer service people will tell you what they suggest for their particular products.
     
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