Why stars become bright then dim then bright, etc.

Discussion in 'High Ideas' started by Lerf, Apr 15, 2012.

  1. So many of us that get really fucking high, I mean really fucking high, high to the point where galaxies start fighting each other and shit. Well I starred at the stars for a bit today and I noticed them getting brighter then getting dimmer and brighter, if you know what I mean. Look at the stars, you can notice the level of brightness intensity changing. What I figured out is this is because those stars are a lot of light years away. Notice that a fucking light year is like a whole year a light takes to get there. So I was like holy shit, at one point in time a meator or planet or another star is going to move in the lights way and cause the brightness thing. OHHHHHHHHH YEA :cool::cool::cool::cool::cool: happy tripping
     
  2. Nah man. They "twinkle" like that because of particles in the earth's upper atmosphere. The light gets bounced around and makes it seem like the stars are flashing

    I think lol. Been a while since I took astronomy
     

  3. Well damn.... Hey still though, I bet galileo thought the same thing... So im not stupid I just never took astronomy. My brain is in good working order though. Thanks for feed back :wave: :rolleyes::rolleyes: :eek::eek::cool::hello::D:wave::wave::eek:
     
  4. Stop blinking while looking at the stars they will stop twinkling
     
  5. lol an object would have to be VERY large to pass infront of a star hundreds of thousands of light years away and block its light..... as said above its likely atmospheric interference

    Considering that objects dont zoom around fast enough to just blip out a star that quick too lol... like imagine if some other planet far far away was looking at our star and jupiter passed infront of it.. it wouldnt just be there, blink, and back, it would block some of its light for a good while.... but probably not even enough to notice
     
  6. Even though that's not the reason that stars twinkle, you're not completely off in thinking that the variation in a stars brightness can be caused by objects passing in front of it. One of the ways that exoplanets are found is by measuring the change in a star's brightness when the planet passes in front of it. Of course, you wouldn't be able to notice this change because it takes a while for a planet to cross it, but still the basic idea is the same.
     
  7. #7 xAceman, Apr 17, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 17, 2012
    So you are saying PARTICLES in the atmosphere of the Earth can make them twinkle, but things beyond earth's atmosphere much larger than particles can't? That doesn't makes sense. I think he figured it out perfectly when he was high. Everything is in the same atmosphere really, whether or not it is currently magnetized to the earth shouldn't matter.

    Fucking amazing work OP, being high clears your mind and allows your universal intuition to function on scales unfamiliar to the normal, unhigh human brain. Einstein liked to develop his theories while unobstructed from the minutia of modern life. Weed can take you there.
     
  8. [quote name='"xAceman"']

    So you are saying PARTICLES in the atmosphere of the Earth can make them twinkle, but things beyond earth's atmosphere much larger than particles can't? That doesn't makes sense. I think he figured it out perfectly when he was high. Everything is in the same atmosphere really, whether or not it is currently magnetized to the earth shouldn't matter.

    Fucking amazing work OP, being high clears your mind and allows your universal intuition to function on scales unfamiliar to the normal, unhigh human brain. Einstein liked to develop his theories while unobstructed from the minutia of modern life. Weed can take you there.[/quote]

    No, I said particles in the upper atmosphere bounce a star's light around. That's not the same as "particles making them twinkle."

    You and the OP are still wrong. If you're right, then why don't planets appear to twinkle?

    Checkmate.
     

  9. However... they use highly advanced telescopic devices to measure these lol......
     

  10. What? Wait...im not...are we playing chess? I will not engage in such internet fighting as I am sensing you would like to.


    ...yes it is? :confused:


    They do, actually, just not as much. And the difference is because they are RELATIVELY closer. There is therefore less matter in between them and us to "bounce the light around"/twinkle...

    I want to make sure that this doesn't come across as rude or whatever so I'm going to end this with a smiley face :)
     
  11. I think this is why I have feds on me. I've recently seen 4 unmarked 2011-2012 SUVS and Ford F150 and Ive actually caught one of those unmarked vehicles following me. I know they are feds for sure because one of the Suburban SUV's has a government tag on it. IDK why feds are on me or something, is unmentionable really that bad, like am I going to invent another nuclear bomb or something?
     
  12. [quote name='"Lerf"']I think this is why I have feds on me. I've recently seen 4 unmarked 2011-2012 SUVS and Ford F150 and Ive actually caught one of those unmarked vehicles following me. I know they are feds for sure because one of the Suburban SUV's has a government tag on it. IDK why feds are on me or something, is unmentionable really that bad, like am I going to invent another nuclear bomb or something?[/quote]

    Uuuuhhhhh you think feds are onto you because stars twinkle???

    You need serious help if so, not joking.....
     
  13. They probably just want to know what did you do with the first nuclear bomb you invented.
     
  14. smh... another thread of someone with no education going "what if" about something they cant possibly explain without years of schooling.
     
  15. #15 Hydroriffic, Apr 22, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2012
    id be more worried about the marked ones.

    [​IMG]
    sssshhhh sirsog dont blow your cover.
     

  16. If it wasn't for people going "what if" then we couldn't explain anything. It's called intuition. Einstein was famous for having great intuition.
     
  17. The upper atmosphere does have lots of space junk floating around, about 5,500 tons of stuff. like screw's and old satellite's and shit. so that could bounce light around. it would, cus metal is shiny (sometimes). I'm sure if you looked it up you could find out why this is..
    Also, wtf? fed's are after you for twinkling the star's?? the unmentionables you're on are probably not very good for you..
     

  18. They made a satellite that stares at stars looking for little spots that might be planets and they've found like 30... that's kinda pathetic to be honest ha
    You're 100% right though, trippy stoner minds
     
  19. Going pack to the planet twinkle thing, if you've ever looked at a planet through a telescope when it's low on the horizon or if there is other atmospheric disturbances (high humidity, haze etc.) you will notice that the planet seems to "wiggle" due to the refraction of it's light through the particles. Once in a while though you will get a straight, clear view. Patience is the key to astronomy.:D Clarity and seeing are two things astronomers pay attention to which is related to this refraction of light.
     
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