Why Organic?

Discussion in 'Growing Organic Marijuana' started by organicjake, Apr 10, 2016.

  1. Hey guys, I'm putting together a pamphlet that highlights why the average cannabis consumer would care or want their cannabis to be organic for the local club. I was hoping that some of you could give me a range of reasons, on top of the ones i'm already planning on using which are as follows:

    better taste
    better smell
    no pesticides/insecticides
    higher potency(usually)
    environmentally friendly production
    no nutes "left over in weed"
    the way nature intended

    Any other thoughts as to why organic cannabis is better than synthetically grown?

    any input would be greatly appreciated. :) ~ Jake
     
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  2. You may want to change the 3rd item to "no CHEMICAL pesticides" - even neem oil is considered a pesticide.

    J
     
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  3. good call! thanks!
     
  4. Once you put in the work on the front-end, you can be incredibly lazy, incorporate a SIP, and you only have to bother with the plants once or twice a week: carefree, easy growin'
     
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  5. I'd say 3-5 of your points are subjective ..not science fact
     
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  6. Depending on your specific organic methods, an organic garden can be considerably less expensive to run than a bottle fed garden. I haven't spent cash money besides electricity in a very long time.
     
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  7. I think he is looking for reasons someone buying weed at dispensary would choose organic over other growing methods.
     
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  8. organic grown is GMO free.

    also you could list the potential harms from using chemical pesticides as negatives for non organic cannabis:
    What are the possible risks of pesticides?
    • Some studies have indicated that the use of pesticides even at low doses can increase the risk of certain cancers, such as leukemia, lymphoma, brain tumors, breast cancer and prostate cancer.
    • Children and fetuses are most vulnerable to pesticide exposure because their immune systems, bodies, and brains are still developing. Exposure at an early age may cause developmental delays, behavioral disorders, autism, immune system harm, and motor dysfunction.
    • Pregnant women are more vulnerable due to the added stress pesticides put on their already taxed organs. Plus pesticides can be passed from mother to child in the womb, as well as through breast milk. Some exposures can cause delayed effects on the nervous system, even years after the initial exposure.
    • Most of us have an accumulated build-up of pesticide exposure in our bodies due to numerous years of exposure. This chemical "body burden" as it is medically known could lead to health issues such as headaches, birth defects, and added strain on weakened immune systems.
    • The widespread use of pesticides has led to the emergence of “super weeds” and “super bugs,” which can only be killed with extremely toxic poisons like 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (a major ingredient in Agent Orange).

    source:
    Organic Foods: Understanding the Benefits of Organic Food and What the Different Labels Really Mean
     
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  9. #9 moldresistantstrains, Apr 14, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2016
    I have been an organic vegetable and marijuana grower here in Hawaii for 10+ years, a few discrepancies I see here...

    There are no GMO varieties of marijuana currently available. (worldnewsdailyreport is a troll site)

    Pesticides aren't used commonly in marijuana growing. Weed is not much of a susceptible plant, and has it's own natural defenses. Most non-organic growers are indoor growers - no need for pesticides when you have a controlled environment.

    There are always going to be "nutes" left in a plant. No living plant is completely devoid of nutrients. Many organic growers use long-term fertilizer in the soil that breaks down slowly. These cannot be simply "flushed" out as they are continuously breaking down, releasing nutrients into the soil. The irony is, growing in a lifeless medium such as perlite is a lot more sensible for people who really want to "flush" their plants. Perlite does not retain any nutrients - so growers add nutrients to each watering or foliar feed.

    That being said, I believe the main benefit of organic growing is the long-term soil health. In real living organics, the soil is alive with a whole ecosystem of micro life and beasties. Their main goal is to break down organic matter to feed on and expand themselves. There are fungus(mycorrhizal) that symbiotically grow on the roots of plants such as cannabis. Mycorrhizal fungus will break down organic matter and as they do so, force-feed nutrients into the roots of the plant in order to stimulate more root growth. This will give them more habitat to grow on - a win-win situation, as we know healthier roots equals healthier plants.

    Many people believe that taking advantage of mycorrhizal fungus leads to marijuana plants with higher resin production, higher THC, improved resilience, and bigger yield. This is because as the fungus is happily feeding the plant through its roots, your plant has a work-load taken off it's normal duties; feeding itself. Now the cannabis plant can use it's energy to focus on other parts of it's growth cycle, preparing for and producing a healthy, lush flowering period.
    .
     
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  10. <<< This.
    Scoobie, comin through on some awesome stuff yet again!

    while in a perfect world would be true, unfortunately shit happens and i know many growers end up with spider mites, thrips, etc. As mentioned earlier in the thread, i believe, organic pesticides can be used. A fellow grower let me "see his room" and coincidentially a few days later, i had spider mites. I eliminated them with cold pressed neem oil or spinosad, or a rosemary/lemon/cayanne extract mixture every three days for two weeks, and they were gone. A lot of inorganic growers will bomb a room or spray an irresponsible chemical on their plants. It works, almost 100% of the time but at what cost?
     
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  11. In this context i believe "nutes" refers to the chemicals used in synthetic nutrients, not nutes as in the nutrients a plant uses to grow.
     
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  12. Good point here
     
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  13. Synthetic nutrients are just derivatives of organic nutrients, look at the ingredients of any chemical fertilizer. You won't see "harsh chemicals"......you just have different nutrients listed. No matter what fertilizer you use, the plant takes up the same nutrients in the end (if they are available). A plant can only take up the smallest broken down nutrient particles, cations. So I wouldn't believe someone's plant is going to taste like bananas because they mulch it with bananas.

    I think the whole "killer chemical fertilizer" thing got started by people who thought they were better than "dirty" non-organic growers. Sure, nitrogen is a problem when it leaches into the water, but organic fertilizer is potentially more dangerous with the amount of bacteria in it as well as the nitrogen. I am an organic grower btw - the main reason I don't use chemical fertilizers is because they are salt-based, and that salt will dehydrate your mycorrhizal fungus - akin to putting salt on a slug, this will in turn destroy your microlife.
     
  14. #14 waktoo, Apr 15, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 15, 2016
    You seem a bit confused as to what "salt" means...

    Salt (chemistry) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Salt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
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  15. Care to elaborate on that for clarification? I'm a little bit confused on what you're trying to say.....

    All I know is that chemicals fertilizers such as Miracle Gro are formed up into sodium crystals, that's how they keep the readily-available nitrogen (a gas) from escaping. This is what makes them "water soluble", as the salt fertilizer crystals dissolve, the nitrogen is released. That is why once you mix Miracle Gro, you have to use it within a short time frame.
     
  16. Have you looked at the "guaranteed analysis" label on the back of ANY chemical fertilizer? Derivatives of phosphates and sulfates, mostly. Highly reactive ions are chelated with EDTA. Where's the sodium that you speak of?
     
  17. Fertilizer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    All phosphate fertilizers are obtained by extraction from minerals containing the anion PO43−. In rare cases, fields are treated with the crushed mineral, but most often more soluble salts are produced by chemical treatment of phosphate minerals. The most popular phosphate-containing minerals are referred to collectively as phosphate rock. The main minerals are fluorapatite Ca5(PO4)3F (CFA) and hydroxyapatite Ca5(PO4)3OH. These minerals are converted to water-soluble phosphate salts by treatment with sulfuric or phosphoric acids.
     
  18. Sooooooo,

    Where's the sodium?
     
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  19. lol, did you even read what I just posted?

    All phosphate fertilizers are obtained by extraction from minerals containing the anion PO43−. In rare cases, fields are treated with the crushed mineral, but most often more soluble salts are produced by chemical treatment of phosphate minerals. The most popular phosphate-containing minerals are referred to collectively as phosphate rock. The main minerals are fluorapatite Ca5(PO4)3F (CFA) and hydroxyapatite Ca5(PO4)3OH. These minerals are converted to water-soluble phosphate salts by treatment with sulfuric or phosphoric acids.
     
  20. Of course I did. What you posted does not address the nature of the "sodium crystals" that you purport to be the basis of all chemical fertilizers.

    At this point, I can see that conversation about any kind of chemistry with you is a lost cause...

    Carry on... :wave:
     
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