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Voter Guide

Discussion in 'Legalization and Activism' started by RMJL, Nov 8, 2003.

  1. "This voter guide covers the major candidates in contested New Hampshire presidential primary races, including President George W. Bush. Thanks to the efforts of Granite Staters for Medical Marijuana, a number of candidates recently came out on the record about medical marijuana. We will continuously update these pages as we hear more from the candidates, so please check back for new developments."

    http://www.granitestaters.com/guide/index.html

    Refer back to the link above for any updates on the candidates.
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    Name: Carol Moseley Braun A-

    In short: Former Ambassador Carol Moseley Braun, who served as a U.S. senator from Illinois from 1992 to 1998, voiced support for federal legislation allowing seriously ill people to have medical marijuana, with their doctors' approval.

    What Moseley Braun has done: During her Senate term, Moseley Braun did not take any action to protect medical marijuana patients and neither voted on nor cosponsored legislation specifically addressing medical marijuana.

    What Moseley Braun has said: When asked at a campaign stop in Durham on November 3 if she would sign legislation allowing seriously ill people to use medical marijuana, with their doctors' approval, Moseley Braun responded, "Yes ... You don't have to record me, I'm already on record on this."

    In an April 1998 letter to a constituent, she described the Clinton administration's efforts to punish doctors for recommending medical marijuana under the provisions of state laws, without either praising or condemning the policy. She went on to state that "the limited medical research on the medicinal use of marijuana suggests that there may be some benefits for patients with AIDS, cancer, glaucoma and multiple sclerosis." She urged further research, but she took no legal position on protection for patients while such research proceeds.

    In a July 1994 letter to a constituent, Moseley Braun urged that marijuana be "decriminalized," explaining, "Individuals in possession of small amounts of marijuana should not clog the courts and absorb judicial resources but, instead, be subjected to fines." In comments published in the Feb.-18, 1996, issue of Parade magazine, she suggested decriminalizing "all but wholesale drug distribution," which apparently includes marijuana as well as other illegal drugs.
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    Name: Retired Army General Wesley K. Clark B

    In short: Retired Army General Clark recently became the tenth candidate in the race for president. Because Clark has only vaguely spelled out his position on the issue of medical marijuana, his grade is tentative until he states what his policy will be with greater specificity.

    What Clark has done: Clark, a career military officer, has never held elected office.

    What Clark has said: During the opening of his New Hampshire campaign headquarters on October 25, Clark was asked by a GSMM member whether he will sign legislation allowing the use of medical marijuana for seriously ill people with their doctors' approval. Clark replied, "We're certainly going to take a very, very serious look at that, and I'm really relieved that people are talking about it."

    At a town hall meeting hosted by his campaign on September 26 in Henniker, Clark was asked by a New Hampshire patient and GSMM volunteer, "General Clark, I'm sure you're aware that the Bush administration has been arresting, prosecuting and jailing medical marijuana patients despite the fact that they are complying with state law. Would a Clark administration treat seriously ill people the same way?" Clark replied simply "The answer is 'No.'"
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    Name: Howard Dean C

    In short: Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean would direct the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to study medical marijuana and report its findings within a year. Dean would impose a moratorium on Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) raids on seriously ill medical marijuana patients during that time.

    What Dean has done: During 2002, Vermont's legislature considered H. 645, which would have protected seriously ill Vermonters from arrest and jail for using medical marijuana with their doctors' recommendations. Dean was, as the Rutland Herald reported, "a staunch opponent."

    H. 645 passed the Republican-controlled Vermont House by 82-59, and there were sufficient votes in the Democratic-controlled Senate to pass it there. But Dean used his influence with Senate leaders -- who acknowledged that they didn't want to pass a bill that Dean would veto -- to make sure it never received a floor vote. The legislature did eventually pass, and Dean signed, a bill creating a task force to study the issue. The task force reported in early 2003 that medical marijuana patients deserve legal protection, but Dean's actions guaranteed that medical marijuana patients would continue to face arrest, leaving it to a future governor to fix this injustice.

    What Dean has said: Responding to a question from GSMM's Anthony Harp at a September 19 campaign stop in Berlin, New Hampshire, Dean said, "Medical marijuana should be up to the FDAÅ As president, I will require the FDA to do the studies and evaluate the existing studies within twelve months and then we'll see what they say and then we'll do whatever they say." Asked if he would continue the current policy of raiding medical marijuana patients and providers in states that have reduced or eliminated criminal penalties for medicinal uses of marijuana, Dean replied, "Will I do what [Attorney General] Ashcroft is doing? No, absolutely not." When he was asked, "You would stop the raids?" Dean said, "Yeah, I'm not going to do that, anyway." Asked if that meant he would permanently stop the raids, Dean replied, "Well, I don't want to say 'permanent,' that sounds pretty definite. What I'm not going to do is what Ashcroft is doing."

    Responding to a question from a caller on CNN's Larry King Live show August 4, Dean said "I don't think they should throw people in jail in California ... I will require the FDA within the first 12 months to evaluate marijuana and see if it is, in fact, a decent medicine or not...but we have to do the FDA studies. I think marijuana should be treated like every other drug in the process and there shouldn't be a special process ... to legalize it."

    Responding to a question from Granite Staters for Medical Marijuana's (GSMM) Linda Macia at a health care forum on July 22, Gov. Dean said "I will require the FDA to evaluate the medicinal uses of marijuana, I will require them to do it in one year, we will abide and make law whatever they recommend." On July 1, 2003, Dean wrote, "I do not think marijuana should have a process different than any other drug to evaluate whether or not it has medical value." When questioned on June 14, Dean claimed that on the first day of his administration, he would alter the normal FDA drug-approval process by directing "the FDA to take a fresh look at the existing studies, and issue a report within 60 days." Responding to a question from Granite Staters for Medical Marijuana on June 13, Dean said that there are "appropriate uses for medical marijuana ... like for the treatment of HIV/AIDS patients." Dean reiterated that he would defer to the FDA drug-approval process and claimed that the process "doesn't take years."

    From The Nation, March 31, 2003:
    "[Dean] cannot stand state initiatives that seek to legalize medical marijuana. 'I hate the idea of legislators and politicians practicing medicine,' he says. Should the feds be busting medical marijuana clubs? 'Depends on the circumstances,' he says. 'In general, no.' If he were president, Dean adds, he would force the Food and Drug Administration to evaluate medical marijuana, and he would be prepared to accept its findings."

    What Dean's statements mean: Dean's pledge to impose a moratorium on the DEA raids is a major step in the right direction, though Dean should show compassion for seriously ill patients by pledging to permanently stop the raids.
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    Name: Sen. John Edwards (D-NC) D-

    In short: Edwards has publicly stated that he thinks it would be "irresponsible" to end the Justice Department's policy of arresting patients and caregivers who defy federal law. In late August, Edwards' campaign repeatedly attempted to block peaceful protesters with Granite Staters for Medical Marijuana (GSMM) from expressing their views during campaign events in public spaces. While "F" grades are reserved only for candidates whose actions cause the arrest of patients, Edwards earned a "D-" because he would jail patients, if elected president.

    What Edwards has done: Edwards has not taken any action to protect medical marijuana patients. He has neither cosponsored nor voted on legislation specifically addressing medical marijuana.*

    What Edwards has said: Responding to a question at his August 24 town hall meeting in Keene Central Square Park about his whether, as president, he would stop Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) raids on seriously ill medical marijuana patients, Sen. Edwards reiterated his position that he would not end the raids. When five GSMM members attempted to enter the park with signs protesting Edwards' position favoring the raids, several campaign staff members stopped them, telling the protesters they could not bring signs into the public park. Edwards' campaign workers held signs in front of picketers once they entered, attempting to block view of the picketers' signs from voters and journalists in the park. When public outrage over the tactic mounted, the Edwards campaign workers stopped blocking the placards. Terry Bennett of Keene, who is not a GSMM member, asked Edwards, "Are there going to be supporters with the John Edwards signs all along the campaign trail blocking access to other people with dissenting views?" and Sen. Edwards replied by falsely claiming, "I have seen some of these signs that said 'John Edwards" Æ look at this, I saw one over there, I don't see one now Æ 'John Edwards hates cancer patients.'" When Bennett persisted with Edwards, saying "But not by blocking access," Edwards conceded, "I agree with that, I agree with that. That's fair, that's fair."

    When he was asked about stopping Drug Enforcement Administration raids on the seriously ill at his campaign forum on August 21, 2003, Edwards responded, "I don't think you can say to people who work for you 'no, ignore violations of the law. I think that's irresponsible for the president to do ... it is what I believe is the right answer right now."

    Responding to questions from Granite Staters for Medical Marijuana on July 7, 2003 on C-SPAN, Edwards stated his intention to set up a commission to study the therapeutic benefits of medical marijuana. When asked if he would jail seriously ill patients while his commission studies medical marijuana, Edwards responded "what'd you just say, there are raids?" However, when asked a week later on July 15, 2003 whether he would continue the current policy of jailing sick patients, he responded "the government has a responsibility to enforce the laws," echoing a comment he made six weeks earlier.

    On May 29, 2003, Edwards was quoted in the San Francisco Chronicle , as saying, "I wouldn't change the [marijuana] law now, but I would set up a committee to see if pain relief is different with marijuana." The article went on to state that Edwards showed "little sympathy for people arrested for behavior that's legal under California law." "It's the job of the Justice Department to enforce the law as it presently exists," said Edwards.

    In a February 2003 letter to a constituent, he stated, "I cannot endorse the medical use of marijuana while a significant number of medical professionals continue to oppose this practice." However, he did promise, "I will continue to follow this issue closely, and I will actively consider the views of opponents and proponents of medical marijuana use."

    What Edwards' statements mean: His campaign's actions raise serious doubts about how an Edwards administration would treat civil liberties. Edwards has also consistently downplayed his own stance, or exaggerated others' messages in attempts to mitigate the heartlessness of his medical marijuana position.
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    Name: Rep. Richard Gephardt (D-MO) B-

    In short: While Gephardt voted for a 1998 resolution condemning state efforts to legalize medical marijuana, he recently stated he supports states' rights to protect seriously ill medical marijuana patients and would stop the federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) raids on medical marijuana patients in the states that allow it for seriously ill patients.

    What Gephardt has done: In 1998, Gephardt voted for H.J.Res. 117, a resolution opposing efforts to legalize marijuana or other Schedule I drugs for medical use. The resolution condemned "efforts to circumvent" the Food and Drug Administration's drug-approval process via state medical marijuana laws, and it contained language suggesting that medical marijuana laws add to "ambiguous cultural messages about marijuana use [that] are contributing to a growing acceptance of marijuana use among children and teenagers." The resolution passed by a vote of 310-93. He has neither voted on nor cosponsored other measures specifically addressing medical marijuana.*

    What Gephardt has said: What Gephardt has said: At a house party in Manchester on September 1 that was broadcast live on C-SPAN, Granite Staters for Medical Marijuana (GSMM) member Leonard Epstein asked Gephardt if, as president, he would stop Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) raids on medical marijuana patients in states that allow it for seriously ill people. Gephardt responded by saying "It should be a state issue." When Epstein persisted, asking, "So, would you stop the raids, then?" Gephardt responded, "That's what I just said. It should be a state issue, states should determine the policy."

    When GSMM's Linda Macia told Gephardt at a campaign stop on July 20, "I'm a patient and a medical marijuana advocate. I'm really ill, and I can't use drugs at all. I'm allergic to narcotics, I need your help. States' rights for sick people to--," Gephardt immediately said, "That's what I'm for...states' rights." When asked if he would sign federal legislation to allow seriously ill people to use medical marijuana with their doctors' approval, he responded, "Sure."
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    Name: Sen. Bob Graham (D-FL) D- Dropped Out

    In short: Graham opposed federal legislation legalizing medical marijuana and would not have stopped the current administration's policy of arresting and jailing seriously ill patients and their caregivers.

    What Graham has done: Graham has not taken any action to protect medical marijuana patients. He has neither cosponsored nor voted on any legislation specifically addressing medical marijuana.*

    What Graham has said: On Monday, October 6, Graham withdrew his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination, saying on CNN's Larry King Live, "I have made the judgment that I cannot be elected president of the United States."

    Questioned on New Hampshire Public Radio on August 18, 2003 by GSMM, Graham said, "There are several things I intend to do shortly after I take the oath of office ... give me a few more hours before I get around to that specific DEA issue." Responding to a follow up question, Graham continued "I don't think the scientific evidence is there today to justify it [medical uses of marijuana], plus the fact I think it would be very difficult to enforce your drug laws if you had such a big exception to them."

    Responding to a question from Granite Staters for Medical Marijuana at a July 3, 2003 campaign stop, Graham said, "If a state, like Oregon, has said that this, their judgment, is appropriate...although I would disagree with it, I would defer to the state judgment." When Graham announced his presidential candidacy in February 2003, ABCNews.com reported, "Graham does not support legalizing marijuana. His spokeswoman said...Graham 'generally disfavors' federal pre-emption of state law."

    In a lengthy letter to a constituent in January 1999, Graham wrote, "We must continue to evaluate all possible effects" of "legalization of marijuana for medicinal use." Graham went on to cite many of the standard arguments used by opponents, stating, for example, "The use of marijuana for medicinal purposes runs the risk of creating an environment where our children believe that marijuana use is a legitimate, and even healthy, recreational activity." Nevertheless, he did not come out against medical marijuana laws or in favor of federal efforts to undercut state laws.

    What Graham's statements mean: In his August 18 New Hampshire Public Radio appearance, Graham retreated from his previous statement supporting the states' rights to decide, saying he would not immediately end the Bush administration's policy of arresting medical marijuana patients in states that have legalized the medical use of marijuana.
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    Name: Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) B+

    In short: Kerry would stop the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) raids on seriously ill medical marijuana patients as president. Kerry has previously said he favors federal legislation to allow people with cancer, AIDS, and other serious illnesses to have medical marijuana, with their doctors' approval.

    What Kerry has done: Kerry recently co-authored a letter asking the Drug Enforcement Administration to approve a proposal from the University of Massachusetts Amherst to manufacture marijuana for FDA-approved medical marijuana research. In the October 20 letter to DEA Administrator Karen Tandy, Kerry criticized the National Institute on Drug Abuse's "unjustified monopoly on the production of marijuana for legitimate medical research." The letter also notes, "Federal law makes clear that the ... bulk manufacture of Schedule I and II substances must be provided `under adequately competitive conditions.' ... The current lack of such competition may well result in the production of lower-quality research-grade marijuana, which in turn jeopardizes important research."

    Kerry has neither cosponsored nor voted on legislation directly addressing medical marijuana.*

    What Kerry has said: During a Kerry town hall meeting in Henniker on September 20, Granite Staters for Medical Marijuana (GSMM) asked Kerry, "Would you stop the raids, as president?" Kerry responded by saying simply, "Yes."

    At an August 6 event hosted by his campaign, GSMM's Linda Macia asked Kerry, "On the day you take office, will you stop the DEA raids?" Kerry offered to "clarify" his earlier remarks, saying, "My personal disposition is open to the issue of medical marijuana. I believe there is a study underway analyzing what the science is. I want to get that scientific review" before making any decisions. He said he would "put a moratorium on the raids" pending this review, but he didn't commit to any long-term action to protect patients from arrest.

    On July 2, responding to a question from Linda Macia, Kerry said, "I'm in favor of" medical marijuana. Kerry added that he wanted "a full analysis of it" and continued, saying, "I've been in favor of its prescription, its prescription for people. We even passed a bill in Massachusetts to allow that to happen."

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    Name: Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-OH) A+

    In short: On May 29, 2003, Kucinich was quoted in the San Francisco Chronicle as supporting medical marijuana "without reservation" and indicated that as president he would be willing to sign an executive order permitting its use. This is on the heels of his May 27 announcement calling for a broad rethinking of anti-drug policies, emphasizing treatment over criminalization. On May 1, Kucinich signed on as cosponsor of the positive Truth in Trials Act. He has come full circle on the subject, having voted for the 1998 resolution condemning state medical marijuana initiatives.

    What Kucinich has done*: Kucinich was the first Democratic presidential candidate to come out in favor of medical marijuana in May 2003. On July 23, 2003, Kucinich voted for the Hinchey/Rohrabacher amendment to the Commerce-Justice-State appropriations bill that would have barred the Justice Department, including the Drug Enforcement Administration, from spending any money to raid or arrest medical marijuana patients and providers in the states that have eliminated or reduced penalties for medical use of marijuana.

    On May 1, 2003, Kucinich became the first of the announced presidential candidates serving in Congress to cosponsor positive medical marijuana legislation: H.R. 1717, the Truth in Trials Act. This measure would remove the federal gag on medical marijuana defendants, allowing federal defendants to present evidence about the medical aspects of their marijuana-related activity. It would keep them from being sent to federal prison if it were determined that they were acting in compliance with state medical marijuana laws.

    In 1998, Kucinich voted for H.J.Res. 117, a resolution opposing efforts to legalize marijuana or other Schedule I drugs for medical use. The resolution condemned "efforts to circumvent" the Food and Drug Administration's drug-approval process via state medical marijuana laws, and it contained language suggesting that medical marijuana laws add to "ambiguous cultural messages about marijuana use [that] are contributing to a growing acceptance of marijuana use among children and teenagers." The resolution passed by a vote of 310-93.

    What Kucinich has said: At a town hall meeting hosted by his campaign on October 22, a GSMM member thanked Kucinich for his compassionate position on medical marijuana. Kucinich replied, "The sight of federal agents going in and busting terminally ill medical marijuana patients in California, to me ... is just a sign of government gone wrong. It's just a matter of simple human awareness and compassion."

    At his Manchester campaign headquarters opening, Kucinich responded to a statement of gratitude for his compassion on medical marijuana from GSMM member Linda Macia, saying "It's not even a question, if someone needs it," referring to medical marijuana. Kucinich then left the podium and stepped toward a teary-eyed Macia to hug her. "How are you doing?" Kucinich asked. Macia responded, "I'm in a lot of pain." When Kucinich returned to the podium, he said "Thank you, Linda ... In my administration, you're going to get the help you need."

    Kucinich bolstered his previous strong public statement on July 22, 2003 with an impassioned speech urging his colleagues' support for an amendment to an appropriations bill that would have barred the Justice Department, including the Drug Enforcement Administration, from spending any money to raid or arrest medical marijuana patients and providers in the states that have eliminated or reduced penalties for medical use of marijuana. Rep. Kucinich added the mention of his floor speech to his campaign newsletter, saying "He spoke out on the House floor, as he has on the campaign, for an amendment to stop Attorney General Ashcroft's crusade against patients who use medical marijuana to alleviate their suffering in the 10 states that allow it."

    From the San Francisco Chronicle, May 29, 2003: "Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio became the first Democratic presidential candidate to endorse the legalization of medical marijuana when he told The Chronicle on Wednesday it should be available 'to any patient who needs it to alleviate pain and suffering,' regardless of the current federal drug laws. 'Compassion requires that medical marijuana be available' Kucinich said during a telephone interview after a campaign stop in Cupertino. 'We must have health-care systems which are compassionate ... so I support it without reservation.'

    "Kucinich said that as president, 'I'd sign an executive order that would permit its use.'"
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    Name: Sen. Joseph Lieberman (D-CT) D+

    In short: Lieberman cosponsored a 1998 U.S. Senate resolution condemning state efforts to legalize medical use of marijuana. We have upgraded Lieberman from a "D-" to a "D+" based on his recent positive statement about medical marijuana, though Lieberman must make a stronger statement about protecting patients before he moves out of the "D" range.

    What Lieberman has done: In 1998, Lieberman cosponsored S.J.Res. 56, opposing efforts to legalize marijuana or other Schedule I drugs for medical use. The resolution condemned "efforts to circumvent" the Food and Drug Administration's drug-approval process via state medical marijuana laws, and it contained language suggesting that medical marijuana laws add to "ambiguous cultural messages about marijuana use [that] are contributing to a growing acceptance of marijuana use among children and teenagers." Lieberman is the only senator now running for president who cosponsored this resolution, which never received a floor vote. He has not voted on other legislation specifically addressing medical marijuana.*

    What Lieberman has said: During his October 28 appearance on New Hampshire Public Radio's program The Exchange, Lieberman responded to a GSMM question, saying, "I was at a forum at St. Anselm College and somebody asked me that last night and I frankly haven't given it the thought I want to give it, and I'm going to do that real quickly. My recollection is that as a Senator, influenced to a great degree by people like Barry McCaffrey, and some studies that were done, I thought by the Institute of Medicine, that questioned whether marijuana was necessary as a pain reducer, which I gather is what most people are asking about here, whether it wouldn't be better for the health of people and for society if they used other pain killers. But I've now had a bunch of people here in New Hampshire ask me this question and I want to go back and look at it again. One of the gentlemen last night gave me a fact sheet that I'm going to review. So I promise you, keep asking, and as soon as I reach a judgment -- which, I'm not going to delay it a long time -- I'll answer that question."

    Questioned about whether he would stop arresting patients as president, at a campaign stop on September 14, Lieberman said, "I would never want, in this setting, to make a blanket statement about what prosecutors might do. I will say more generally that youêd always hope that prosecutors would focus in enforcing the law on the areas that are of most threat to public safety." Lieberman also mentioned his support for a 1998 Senate Joint Resolution condemning state efforts to remove or reduce criminal penalties for seriously ill people using medical marijuana, which he cosponsored. Lieberman said he did not support state efforts to reduce penalties for medical marijuana patients, "because there was a report from the Institute of Medicine that ... said that the case was not made that medical use of marijuana was necessary or even appropriate," Lieberman said.

    At a campaign stop in Manchester on August 31, GSMM asked Lieberman if, as president, he would continue the raids on seriously ill medical marijuana patients. Lieberman responded, "I'm going to have to take a pass and get back to you...I didn't know about that...make sure you give that lady behind you your information and I'll give you an answer." Lieberman made his first public medical marijuana statement from the presidential campaign trail on July 6, 2003, telling GSMM he would "probably" sign legislation to allow seriously ill people to use medical marijuana, with their doctors' approval. Lieberman went on to say, "I'm sympathetic." Expressing a very different view in a 1999 letter to a constituent, Sen. Lieberman wrote, "State ballot initiatives legalizing marijuana for medicinal use circumvent the established Food and Drug Administration (FDA) drug approval process...." He also indicated he was sorry the resolution described above never received a floor vote.

    What Lieberman's statements mean: Lieberman's most recent statements are confusing, because, in one instance, he used the Institute of Medicine report to justify his previous opposition to medical marijuana (researchers who presented an Institute of Medicine report funded by the White House drug policy office concluded in 1999, "there are some limited circumstances in which we recommend smoking marijuana for medical uses..."). Lieberman's letter greatly exaggerated and oversimplified the dangers of marijuana. And like Howard Dean, Lieberman confused the issue by connecting medical marijuana with FDA drug approval. The FDA does not arrest patients for using unapproved drugs, and under the best possible circumstances, FDA drug approval takes years. Medical marijuana laws have no impact on FDA drug approval; they simply ensure that seriously ill people do not face arrest and jail under state law for taking their medicine.
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    Name: Rev. Al Sharpton I

    In short: Incomplete. Although a critic of mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenders, Sharpton has not spoken on the issue of medical marijuana. It's hard to imagine he wouldn't be a supporter, but until he speaks to this issue, we cannot grade him.

    What Sharpton has done: Sharpton has never held elected office. In 1991, he founded the National Action Network, which works on a variety of social issues. (He has worked extensively with activists seeking to reform New York's draconian Rockefeller drug laws.) We are not aware of any actions Sharpton has taken directly related to medical marijuana.

    What Sharpton has said: We are not aware of any public statements by Sharpton about medical marijuana. Please check back for updates as the campaign progresses.
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    Name: President George W. Bush F

    In short: Asked about medical marijuana as he campaigned for president in 1999, George W. Bush said he believes "each state can choose that decision as they so choose" (sic). Yet the Bush administration has arrested, prosecuted, and imprisoned medical marijuana patients and providers at an alarming rate. Administration officials have aggressively campaigned against local and state proposals to protect medical marijuana patients.

    What Bush has done: The Bush administration has conducted an unrelenting assault on medical marijuana dispensaries in California and attempted to undercut Proposition 215, the ballot initiative approved by Californians in 1996 that allows legal access to medical marijuana. Dozens of patients and providers have been arrested or seen their homes raided, and other medical marijuana distributors have shut down out of fear of federal attacks. In October 2002, Bryan Epis became the first person convicted of federal marijuana charges stemming from his work as a medical marijuana patient and provider, and he is now serving a 10-year mandatory minimum sentence. Other Bush administration actions include the September 2002 raid on the Wo/Men's Alliance for Medical Marijuana -- during which a disabled woman was held at gunpoint and handcuffed to a bed -- and the January 2003 conviction of Ed Rosenthal, who grew medical marijuana at the request of the city of Oakland, but who was not allowed to discuss the medical aspects of his case in court.

    Bush's drug czar, John Walters, is an anti-marijuana zealot who has compared medical marijuana to "medicinal crack."

    What Bush has said: October 16, 1999: While campaigning in Seattle, Bush was asked by a reporter if he supported a state's right to allow legal access to medical marijuana. Bush's response surprised many: "I believe each state can choose that decision as they so choose" (sic). Bush aides later clarified that he does not support legalizing medical marijuana. Bush also told reporters that a law protecting medical marijuana patients was "not going to happen in Texas."

    Bush has not spoken about medical marijuana since taking office as president.
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    *All current members of the House and Senate running for president have voted for District of Columbia appropriations bills that included anti-medical marijuana provisions, but there was never a separate vote on any such amendment.
     
  2. *bump*
     
  3. I wanted Mr. Kucinich to win the presidential race. I am not from NH but he is truly the way of change:D
     

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