The Source of Imagination

Discussion in 'High Ideas' started by BluntCunt17, Dec 13, 2012.

  1. I remember a few years ago when I was still pretty new to smoking I had this really crazy theory of imagination, but it wasn't so crazy as it has stuck with me and allowed me a few very nice debates. Here goes:
    Our imagination isn't merely our mind being "overly productive with creativity." Though that does play a role in some cases, one has to think where the first 'creative idea' stemmed from. I believed (and still do, to some extent) that our imagination isn't creativity; it is our ancestral memories from long long ago.
    Why do we think of time travel, mind reading, and levitation? Because we were capable of it before.
    Think about it, we as humans today only use about 10% of our brain. What happens if we unlock the other 90% ? Like the levitating monks: through years of meditation and I'm pretty sure other factors, they can levitate and do other amazing things because they unlocked other parts of their brain!

    It's crazy, I know.. So I'll let this simmer in your 10% brains for a while ;)
     
  2. Actually we don't use only 10% of our brain. We only use 10% at the same time, big difference here. Men doesn't imagine anything, he perceives a lot of things from his surroundings. And combines known elements in new ways. That's the only thing we are able to do. Try to create a new color, you can't, the first thing you'll do is trying to combine colors you know. :)
     
  3. That's why it's hard to think of where the seed of the imaginative time travel or levitation comes from, well, in my opinion at least
     
  4. I had this exact same thought about a year ago. Weird.
     
  5. Since when do we only use 10% of our brain? Lol I'm pretty sure we use all of oour brain..

    But I believe imagination is a stress relieveer, and an effect from consciousness & intelligence
     
  6. #6 hundredgrand, Dec 20, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 20, 2012
    Some people believe the penis is a wand of light that is the source of creativity and that's why men have all the good ideas. I think all those ideas are just intuitive ideas that come from different sources. time travel comes from a desire to change what you did or see what will happen, levitation is just the wish that you could fly like a bird, mind reading from the desire of wanting to know someone elses thoughts.
     
  7. explain this brain theory
     
  8. lol hows this for imaginetive?

    fuck telpathy
    telekensis
    i got fuckin little bit of both i control bodies movement. BAM punch yoself in the face!
     
  9. The myth that monks have learned to levitate has been debunked several times.

    There is NO proof that any of us have any extra abilities.
     
  10. Thanks for saying it, I didn't wanna.

    actually I just wanted to post my highdea word

    Illusionarium..,...;.....ll.\..... dont' get lost in it.
     
  11. [quote name='"Marsdude"']The myth that monks have learned to levitate has been debunked several times.

    There is NO proof that any of us have any extra abilities.[/quote]

    Well some. Increased pain tolerance, and internal temperature control to name a couple.
     

  12. Yes, I have heard that stuff like that had been documented.
     

  13. I agree with this. We learn by association. There is no such thing as pure inspiration. I actually thought about this last night and combined it with my ideas on spirituality and it blew my mind.
     
  14. Not trying to discredit your overall idea, because it is insightful in some ways. Good on ya mate :Britishaccent: I thought this was true as well until a fellow blade corrected me in a post I had made. But it motivated me to research, and this is just one of many journal publications I've found.

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=do-we-really-use-only-10
     
  15. That would be your cells mitochondria adapting to prolonged exposure to specific stimulus. Every time you feel any sensation, even the smallest nudges to anatomical homeostasis trigger a feeling felt by you, the body. It's an abundance of these specific stimuli that register as pain or discomfort. But your cells are constantly responding to their environment, which means they are adapting or chemically constructing themselves to endure, and ultimately survive the conditions we expose them to.

    "The environments in which cells grow often change rapidly. For example, cells may consume all of a particular food source and must utilize others. To survive in a changing world, cells evolved mechanisms for adjusting their biochemistry in response to signals indicating environmental change. The adjustments can take many forms, including changes in the activities of preexisting enzyme molecules, changes in the rates of synthesis of new enzyme molecules, and changes in membrane-transport processes."

    This results in races of humans that are designed to thrive in specific environments. Like Eskimos for example, who are capable of living in seemingly uninhabitable conditions because of this anatomical phenomenon. But we are a race that uses tools and innovative mechanisms to make things easier for themselves. Our brains are naturally capable of such things.
    So, think of a person wanting to learn to regulate their internal temperature; they may subject themselves incrementally and progressively to either cold, heat, or painful from your examples. Yes, They would in time, develop the ability to do these things. Rapidly adapting themselves. But it isn't unlocking a portion of their brain, it's their bodies learning to survive in their environment.
    If your interested, you can research the Navy Seal (and many other specialized units among various militaries) training to endure extreme cold by internalized temperature regulation. There was this show that put a Seal in freezing water and measured his vitals and actually watched him raise the temperature of his body! Crazy stuff.

    -Rane
     
  16. #16 dankydankk, Jan 7, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 7, 2013
    [quote name='"Rane Vapor"']

    That would be your cells mitochondria adapting to prolonged exposure to specific stimulus. Every time you feel any sensation, even the smallest nudges to anatomical homeostasis trigger a feeling felt by you, the body. It's an abundance of these specific stimuli that register as pain or discomfort. But your cells are constantly responding to their environment, which means they are adapting or chemically constructing themselves to endure, and ultimately survive the conditions we expose them to.

    "The environments in which cells grow often change rapidly. For example, cells may consume all of a particular food source and must utilize others. To survive in a changing world, cells evolved mechanisms for adjusting their biochemistry in response to signals indicating environmental change. The adjustments can take many forms, including changes in the activities of preexisting enzyme molecules, changes in the rates of synthesis of new enzyme molecules, and changes in membrane-transport processes."

    This results in races of humans that are designed to thrive in specific environments. Like Eskimos for example, who are capable of living in seemingly uninhabitable conditions because of this anatomical phenomenon. But we are a race that uses tools and innovative mechanisms to make things easier for themselves. Our brains are naturally capable of such things.
    So, think of a person wanting to learn to regulate their internal temperature; they may subject themselves incrementally and progressively to either cold, heat, or painful from your examples. Yes, They would in time, develop the ability to do these things. Rapidly adapting themselves. But it isn't unlocking a portion of their brain, it's their bodies learning to survive in their environment.
    If your interested, you can research the Navy Seal (and many other specialized units among various militaries) training to endure extreme cold by internalized temperature regulation. There was this show that put a Seal in freezing water and measured his vitals and actually watched him raise the temperature of his body! Crazy stuff.

    -Rane[/quote]

    I never said they were "unlocking" anything, but that they were consciously doing something thhat most people cannot do consciously. There are people who can raise their temperature in a constant room temperature environment, which would prove its just not external factors causing the change. The things I've read on it was that the student meditates in Normal conditions until they can control their temperature at will, then go outside if they want to demonstrate. They aren't slowly building up spending alittle more time in the ccold each day..

    Why don't normal people who move to cold climates not develop the same abilities?

    With the increased pain tolerance, many people from what I know, don't practice walking on burning coals alittle at a time over days or weeks until it doesn't hurt anymore. They meditate for and go for it a couple times.

    There's claims that a very experienced meditator can even fast longer than others because of a conscious act to slow metabolism, but no proof yet.

    There is proof that meditation causes neurogenesis , and increases feel good drug levels,

    " They include growth in regions of the brain activated involved with compassion and understanding others, being mindfully aware, sustaining focus on a single object for a long period, and others.

    A University of Massachusetts study, Mindfulness Practice Leads To Increases In Regional Brain Gray Matter Density, revealed that meditators may be benefiting from actual growth in their brain cells. The researchers report that those who meditated for about 30 minutes a day for eight weeks had measurable changes in gray-matter density in parts of the brain associated with memory, sense of self, empathy and reduced stress."

    http://www.brainsync.com/blog/neurogenesis-your-brain-renewed/

    There's loads of info on the positives out there
     
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