The role of enlightenment in life?

Discussion in 'Religion, Beliefs and Spirituality' started by SheenTheSage, Jan 7, 2012.

  1. What is the use in curiosity and enlightenment?

    Is there any beneficial relationship between theory and practice?

    Can we use wisdom in everyday life?

    Or is all contemplation merely innocent but useless trifling concerning matters where exact knowledge is impossible? And does enlightenment have no role in society?
     
  2. #2 OneLove., Jan 8, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 8, 2012
    Curiosity is a tool that educates the young, that keeps the old discovering the roots of knowledge. It motivates conditioning of one's interpretation on the world....

    Enlightenment is the reward for fulfilling one's curiosity... There are multi-dimentional interpretations to the word "enlightenment", though. One can reach spiritual enlightenment, metaphysical enlightenment, or enlightenment that is relevant to happiness and life...

    Without curiosity and enlightenment, we would not be attempting to understand questions like the one you posed. In this society, that is...

    I suppose wisdom can be interpreted to be the flourishing of both enlightenment and curiosity. Cyclical in fashion... Thus:

    Curiosity -> Enlightenment = Wisdom

    (But there must be more curiosity and enlightenment to gain more wisdom, thus one must always strive to be curious, one should always want to become enlightened)..

    If every human didn't have the ability to engage in this cycle, there would be no society. There would be no morality... Radical claim, but we all strive for self-betterment... Wisdom, enlightenment, curiousity in the right ways, not the ethically wrong.

    I feel as if just being curious, or just being skeptical promotes wisdom. Wisdom, nonetheless, is important. It's important because acquiring wisdom, over time, is rewarding - that's reflected to the knowledge one with wisdom carries into the world.

    Let's get trippy and metaphysical, now..

    But, say, you were referring to an external "society" where being is nothingness, or being is eternal, or being is not absolute... No, enlightenment, reason, discovery would not have a place in the world.

    Regardless, all knowledge cannot lead to an end. No matter what wisdom or knowledge one gains, there won't ever be an end. It's limitless... Infinite :)



    When it comes down to it, I have no clue where you were going with this. But I did my best to give my interpretation on it ;)
     
  3. Enlightenment gets you liberation from suffering
     

  4. I've never liked this definition.

    Enlightenment is not an instantaneous switch that will cease suffering. It does not make going to work everyday easier, nor does it negate any squabbling you might have with your wife/family/children. It does not keep you from dying a painful death, nor does it keep you from being robbed. These are all forms of "suffering." The enlightened still thirst for water and hunger for food; they still desire sex and companionship; and they still have to live the same lives that they lived before becoming enlightened.

    Enlightenment simply shows you the path through this world of illusion. I much prefer the Hindu concept of enlightenment, as opposed to the Buddhist one (which you posted), which states that enlightenment frees the mind from duality, from anger and carnal lust, and opens up a person to the dedication of spiritual pursuits and the good of all beings. In the Bhagavad Gita, Krishna makes sure to explain that enlightenment does not end all worldly suffering, such as war...it just allows you to see the higher good of all things.
     
  5. #5 TheAtmansPath, Jan 8, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 9, 2012
    I disagree. I'm not enlightened but everything i've heard points otherwise

    it is mental suffering that it ends, not physical

    this isn't necessarily true. some allegedly don't eat or don't drink, some don't have sex or relationships, and some live alone in the deep woods. and some people's lives change entirely. I'm not sure what makes you think what you said

    I like this and agree with you.
     
  6. not enlightened

    Wake up, chop wood, eat, shower, sleep.

    enlightened


    Wake up, chop wood, eat, shower, sleep.
     
  7. face palming
     
  8. Your taking Enlightenment in such the wrong way man. Even though none of us actually know if your daily life becomes easier, how would it not? The whole point of Enlightenment is to realize that desires and acceptance of those desires is negative. So then if your right, how does the word Enlightenment even exist. Enlightenment was never suppose to end all worldly suffering such as war. The whole point is to end internal suffering within yourself. Enlightenment is one of the greatest gifts a human can receive.
     

  9. Not enlightened.

    Wake up, chop wood, eat, shower, sleep. You do so because you have to not because you want to. You do so because it needs to be done and you know it won't get done otherwise.

    Enlightened.

    Wake up, chop wood, eat, shower, sleep. Doing anything brings you joy. You know who you are and everything excites you.
     
  10. You use your knowledge and wisdom every day of your life. I consider this to be a fact beyond dispute.

    Whether it is useful to expand on that knowledge and wisdom may be a disputable question, but it begs the question of WHY. Why wouldn't you want to understand your life, the consequences of your actions, and the moral worth of your decisions... better?

    People tend to complain about greed or ignorance in society, and I think it comes from people who don't care about these things. So that's what we get if we just let the marketing control us (basically). What if we step back from that and go completely from our id?

    How would that life be different from the life of an animal? I'm hungry... I'll kill this animal or eat some grass. Then I'll wander around until I get hungry again...
     

  11. I disagree with the Buddhist notion of Enlightenment. I'm not "taking it the wrong way," I am saying I think the Hindu variation makes a whole lot more sense. I could never get behind Buddhism because it is, for lack of a better descriptor, so worldly, at least the non-Tibetan varieties.

    Krishna essentially tells Arjuna in the Bhagavad Gita that enlightenment is the path through illusion. This illusion is the self, the ego. All is Atman. This knowledge IS enlightenment according to Hinduism, and it does NOT make life any less hard to bear. It just gives the enlightened person a new path to walk, as Krishna explains to Arjuna that enlightenment changes nothing in this world other than giving you a higher law to conduct yourself by. Once you realize that All is G-d you can't possibly continue in your evil ways, because any evil you do to another is no different than doing evil to yourself or G-d.

    Enlightenment is the unmitigated drive to do selfless service, for the good of all rather than the good of the ego, according to both my spiritual tradition, Hasidic Judaism, and Hinduism. That is enlightenment to me.
     
  12. Curiosity presents change in one's life
     
  13. if ignorance is bliss, knowing is enlightenment :)
     
  14. Enlightenment is like opening a window to let in a breeze. Or pulling up the blinds to reveal a sunrise.
     

  15. I guess there's more than one kind of enlightenment. I think the hindu variety makes sense too, and it could quite possibly be either depending on the enlightenment you get. What is "Worldly"? I just don't understand what that means in this context.

    And that second paragraph i agree with . I kinda think it both ends mental/spiritual suffering AND drives you to selfless service. It allows you to exist in your true self in the now, which is a state of bliss and without suffering. It also brings selfless love of everyone, without attachment . This is just my opinion of course :)
     

  16. Buddhism on paper is highly spiritual. Reading their primary texts presents a whole cosmology of beings and cosmic laws which humans are intrinsically woven into, with the transmigration of souls being directly at the center of the whole drama.

    Buddhism, as practiced by my Buddhist friends, is nothing more than a vain attempt at trying to appear "spiritual" with all that fancy philosophical language and koan recitation, mingled with an intense hatred of western religion. Both of these things are directly against what various Buddhas throughout the ages taught. This is why I call it worldly. These people do what they want, under the guise of "nothing matters, everything is maya." That is directly opposed to Buddhism as a spiritual system. It is a religion by the strictest definition. Even the Dalai Lama has called it a religion.

    Buddhism on paper is great, just as is Christianity. Buddhism as practiced by the Buddhists I know is nothing but a show, and that is the only direct link to Buddhism I have at this time. Don't think that I am looking down upon all Buddhists, because that is not the case...but as is the case with Christianity, one bad apple often spoils the whole bunch.
     
  17. [quote name='"nathann"']

    Buddhism on paper is highly spiritual. Reading their primary texts presents a whole cosmology of beings and cosmic laws which humans are intrinsically woven into, with the transmigration of souls being directly at the center of the whole drama.

    Buddhism, as practiced by my Buddhist friends, is nothing more than a vain attempt at trying to appear "spiritual" with all that fancy philosophical language and koan recitation, mingled with an intense hatred of western religion. Both of these things are directly against what various Buddhas throughout the ages taught. This is why I call it worldly. These people do what they want, under the guise of "nothing matters, everything is maya." That is directly opposed to Buddhism as a spiritual system. It is a religion by the strictest definition. Even the Dalai Lama has called it a religion.

    Buddhism on paper is great, just as is Christianity. Buddhism as practiced by the Buddhists I know is nothing but a show, and that is the only direct link to Buddhism I have at this time. Don't think that I am looking down upon all Buddhists, because that is not the case...but as is the case with Christianity, one bad apple often spoils the whole bunch.[/quote]

    everyone loves having titles.
    few actually live up to them.
    your friends should listen to what you say haha
     
  18. Once there was a thought that buddhism was.
    but then the realization, no, we are beings.
    :)
    many dont even know that the nirvana they seek they have been in, you are that universe. The ignorance once has deceives them otherwise... :)
     

  19. They just tell me that I don't understand Buddhism. When I ask if they've ever read, say, the Tibetan Book of the Dead, or even any of the books written by the Dalai Lama or any of the Rinponches, they just look at me with a "mer?" look on their faces.

    I just invisibly facepalm and change the conversation :laughing:

    In fact, my best friend, a Hasid I grew up with, was "converted" to Buddhism through a book call "Dharma Punx," which is nothing but new age Buddhism, the same tripe I alluded to in my last post. He has never read any other Buddhist text, yet he considers himself a Buddhist. It's just baffling to me how anybody can swear allegiance to a spiritual system and not actually practice it, or have no knowledge of it.
     

  20. Can you put this into everyman's language?

    This is exactly the type of pseudo-philosophical language I'm talking about. Perhaps I'm just too dumb to understand, by all of my spiritual teachers have told me that you don't know a damn about a spiritual concept until you can teach it, in full, to a child.
     
Loading...

Share This Page