so theoretically, can wateer be crushed?

Discussion in 'High Ideas' started by dankydankk, Jul 12, 2012.

  1. Soo say for example you have a metal sphere or box w.e., that has unlimited force, and shrinks somehow by a design, and was air tight at all times, what would happen if such sphere was filled with water aand attempted to shrink? If the water has nowhere to go would a massive explosion happen, or is it already possible to "crush" water
     
  2. Hydrogen bonds are very strong and already arranged in a way that it cant easily be changed. I assume it would shrink until the box broke.
     
  3. Well water foes not compress so no. Id assume if it tried the sphere would just break
     
  4. Cant happen. Water concentrate would be bitchin though..
     
  5. H20 bomb!!
     
  6. [quote name='"flapjack1439"']Well water foes not compress so no. Id assume if it tried the sphere would just break[/quote]

    Ok but what if the sphere theoretically was made of the strongest substance in the universe?

    Does this mean that water is the strongest
     
  7. [quote name='"GreenTheGiant"']Hydrogen bonds are very strong and already arranged in a way that it cant easily be changed. I assume it would shrink until the box broke.[/quote]

    Well the box has "unlimited force" again I know this isn't practical, but would it even be able to shrink at all if there is no air inside? ?
     
  8. Water is not compressible. And its not the strongest. It would do the same thing if it was filled with oil, lead, gold, pretty much any thing that's not compressible.

    The water would shatter the sphere if you froze it though.
     
  9. [quote name='"TheBirdShow"']

    Water is not compressible. And its not the strongest. It would do the same thing if it was filled with oil, lead, gold, pretty much any thing that's not compressible.

    The water would shatter the sphere if you froze it though.[/quote]

    Ok then any liquid,

    So you have an incompressible substance, and an unbreakable sphere, with unlimited force, something has to happen,

    Either liquid beats solid, or somehow water compresses, or ___
     
  10. or there is not a force strong enough
     
  11. [quote name='"illrolling"']or there is not a force strong enough[/quote]

    Its theoretical.. if you had the strongest solid in all of the universe, or just wrote a math sequence with the strength being unlimited, infinity
     
  12. #12 SkunkManSam420, Jul 13, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 13, 2012
    1. Water is very compressible! But that does not go without saying its not easy.The only way to "crush" water, is via ice. These are all things you can easily google.

    The definition of "crush" is a unknown here. Are we talking destroyed, or are we talking smashing to molecules into one another and crushing their composition into something other than original? Scientifically, there are many verbs to describe what a molecule goes through, "crushed" is not one of them.

    Your also throwing the word force around without any precision. Where are these forces coming from, what are their masses, what are their velocities and where abouts are they acting upon another object.

    I think the reason why nobody has been able to give a clear answer, is because the question is very cloudy. Its just not asked in a proper sense that one can comprehend in a sense of physics.

    When you go on to say " Ok then any liquid, so you have an incompressible substance" ( this whole question lies on what the heck in this substance. It is unknow, your answer is unknown). You also again fail to identify matters of force in your broken question.

    It would be of great benefit for you to sit down and think out your questions more. If you don't ask with a certain amount of necessary information, its simple math, we just can't give you an answer. We need more specific information.

    And good god to whomever said Water is not compressible. I take it they have never heard of a water pump. For the record, you can compressible just about any material.

    Think of the ocean. Water at 1,000 ft below sea level, is heavily compressed by the water above it.

    All the Best!~
     

  13. No. Its an incomplete question. One in which you get a incomplete answer, which usually looks like this ?????????????????????????????????:D Be more specific. Its critical information you with hold, that gets you no defined answer.
     
  14. #14 dankydankk, Jul 13, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 13, 2012
    [quote name='"SkunkManSam420"']

    No. Its an incomplete question. One in which you get a incomplete answer, which usually looks like this ?????????????????????????????????:D Be more specific. Its critical information you with hold, that gets you no defined answer.[/quote]

    Yeah I'm just high thinking of shit, since the dude said he knew that water or oil or whatever liquid would not compress, I was thinking of actual liquid water vs ice tthough..

    ...to the specifics though I'm not sure if problems can be worked out with what I'm saying because its fabricated; infinite force, I assume that the means of developing said force are also infinite,
    with the material harnessing the force to also be composed of almost indestructible, i say almost because if an explosion were to happen as a result then obviously the material has to be explodible, and thus destructible and not of infinite resilience,

    But if something were to happen with the strength of such material as infinite then I'd use that
     
  15. #15 SkunkManSam420, Jul 13, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 13, 2012
    :) For me, its a good thing to be high and thinking! But in science, assumptions are a sign of a poor scientist :)

    If you go down to 500' below sea level and close a water tight box and return to sea level and open that box, the water will burst forth as though, shock of shocks, it was under pressure! If water didn't compress, this would never happen.

    There is theoretical arguments made against this. But they are false arguments. Water is very dense, and thus takes an immense amount of pressure to compress it with relative minute results. However, scientist have found planets with so much water deep down in the oceans of this planet that it was a solid state. Not ice, but compressed to a solid state of water. Sounds crazy, but its very true. These scientist speculate that the water below that has become a solid state, is not h20, but possibly Helium, which has a higher atomic mass than Hydrogen.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/05/070517-hot-planet.html

    Hope this helps solve some of your questions. Here is a link about this planet.

    All the Best~
     
  16. [quote name='"SkunkManSam420"']:) For me, its a good thing to be high and thinking! But in science, assumptions are a sign of a poor scientist :)

    If you go down to 500' below sea level and close a water tight box and return to sea level and open that box, the water will burst forth as though, shock of shocks, it was under pressure! If water didn't compress, this would never happen.

    Hope this helps solve some of your questions.

    All the Best~[/quote]

    Well even though its slightly irrelevant to your main point, if one of either velocity or acceleration are infinite, then the force would become same, no?

    But back to topic

    I'm imagining that a super engine is powerimg a sphere that becomes smaller by some mechanism that only effects the sphere without letting air escape,


    Is it ever possible to compress water on land? Space?
     
  17. #17 SkunkManSam420, Jul 13, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 13, 2012
    If a mass had either velocity or acceleration as infinite , then force would be the same, UNLESS :) acted upon by another force! More so, acceleration can be faster than the speed of light, but science is unsure if it can be infinite. In theory, it can, but theories need to be proven.

    Yes water compresses both on land and in space.

    This "sphere" sounds as if it is very heavy, but small, which would equate to a very high density of composition of this sphere. Another variable to these circumstances are, where are we talking, sea level, or on the dark side the moon :)
     
  18. Water does compress. You can get the density up to about 1.5 g/cc at 5000 MPa.
     
  19. [quote name='"SkunkManSam420"']If a mass had either velocity or acceleration as infinite , then force would be the same, UNLESS :) acted upon by another force! More so, acceleration can be faster than the speed of light, but science is unsure if it can be infinite. In theory, it can, but theories need to be proven.

    Yes water compresses both on land and in space.

    This "sphere" sounds as if it is very heavy, but small, which would equate to a very high density of composition of this sphere. Another variable to these circumstances are, where are we talking, sea level, or on the dark side the moon :)[/quote]

    Sea level?
     
  20. Water is not the same as metal is the point. Water is just a different state of the same element or compound. But i think this is the answer to your question? Nature's cutting torch is water, which can cut any mineral down all over the earth.
     
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