Question about using natural droppings on your land.

Discussion in 'Growing Organic Marijuana' started by OutdoorGreen, Jul 15, 2019.

  1. I get a lot of natural droppings from rabbits/large hares/and deer.

    If I wanted to recycle this, of course I should consider wearing a mask of some sort, which would be your suggestion?

    I will have in the next 30 days, a vermicompost setup with nightcrawlers and red worms. Thinking about making use, I could also just let it stay on the ground, less work, sometimes is easier, but if it's beneficial, I'll probably make the best of it.
     
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  2. Work that rabbit crap in the ground and let it rot and mix with your compost pile.
    Take the finished dirt to the feed store, tell em' you are growing tomatoes and have em' analyze the dirt.
    Then you will add lime or whatever they tell you to adjust the PH levels in the dirt and maybe add some different ferts.
     
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  3. I would add a bulking agent like straw, leaves, or rice hulls and run that poop thru a worm bin.
    cheers
    os
     
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  4. Rabbit turds have high N and P compared to Cow, Sheep, Pig, Horse or Chicken so I thought it was good.


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  5. I’m cooking up a mess of frozen bananas for my young ladies :love-mj2:
     
  6. After you get it made, take it to the feed store, I use Southern States here and it's free.
    They analyze and tell you exactly what to add according to the crop. Tell em' you are growing tomatoes.
     
  7. let me put it to you this way. how long is it going to take you to rake and collect each tiny little turd? i have rabbits and deer all over my yard and i see the little poops allllllllll over. the amount of droppings is going to be minimal for the time it takes to collect.

    if you'd like manure, i went on craigslist farm and garden for sale section and i searched for manure. you'll find rabbit droppings from rabbits that live in cages so the poop collects easily so it takes no time at all. sometimes people want money for their aged rabbit and chicken compost but horse people :'D they will offer to haul and deliver it to you for free.That's what i did when i didn't find free manure is i made my own add asking for free manure. sometimes you'll get cow but mostly horse people. you'll want to ask them what they feed their horse and what type of dewormer they use. there are some deworming medications that are very persistent and will kill your worm bin but other worm meds are not and do not effect the worm bed after the manure has aged. aged will look like soil and you won't see horse apples. most people who own horses only have a few so i don't think they are giving them worm meds all the time but you'll get emails from people who have large horse facilities and they will say they will bring you truck loads and truck loads of manure for free with a desperation in their voice. i'd try to stay away from those. i bet @jerry111165 might know a little more about what to ask them.

    you'll want the horse to eat a grain free diet so you don't get seeds sprouting in the manure and eventually our soil. no biggie but if you put it in your outdoor flower beds, expect some grass to sprout. even though horse is not as high in nitrogen, for a worm bin, it works really well.
     
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  8. In regards to picking them up I can simply design up a long armed precision tong that would be super efficient in not hunching me over. So I’m not worried about that but yes time could become an issue.

    I will look into the horse option I live right next to 4 people with horses and another neighbor with sheep.

    Truth be told, I just don’t like any of my neighbors.


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  9. Hot composting is your best bet, if done right it will be finished in 18 days.
     
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  10. I get along better with plants and animals.

    J
     
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  11. These days - now that my garden areas are rich and loaded up with swarming worms I do the mulch thing instead of hot composting - at least most of the time.

    I collect old autumn leaves with my riding mower and garden cart, horse manure from the stall, old hay etc etc and simply mulch mulch mulch - and boy oh boy it works so good. Layering different types of organic matter - I call it “in place composting” - perfect for my lazy ass - and man do I mulch super thick.

    I can peel back that thick carpet mat of mulch on a 100° day when I drive by the local gardens and they’re either dried up dust or having to be watered constantly and my soil under that mulch will be perfectly moist and the worms will be literally swarming, eating up the decomposing bottom layers of mulch. I simply keep adding more and more and more layers. My garden is significantly higher than the surrounding earth height from years of doing this.

    There will also - and so importantly, be a literally 1” to 1.5” thick layer of pure vermicompost under that mulch - the perfect slow release fertilizer. It doesn’t get any better.

    This broccoli was planted as little 3” high plants out of the little black plastic 6-packs on Memorial Day weekend and 6 weeks later I’m harvesting the heads.

    Zero fertilizer used ever. Hell - why on earth would I even need it?

    1750905F-3718-4C7B-8E6B-096CDF32C464.jpeg 5C0E9575-C01D-4A9A-B79F-C5F1CC19A4B8.jpeg 45846C0C-9E74-45E8-B360-1D5A468411DB.jpeg

    Have a good day gardeners!

    J
     
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  12. Those look sexy.

    My gf just reminded me we actually have friends with 2 horses who will gladly give us some poop.



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  13. What is it that you are growing? Is this for cannabis or is it for vegetables or flowers? How soon are you looking to use it?

    In my experience, 90% of the time the horse manure being given away is loaded up with wood shavings. This is used in the horse stalls to soak up urine and poop. It must be decomposed very well before use.

    I am personally use our several year old material first - so if your grit have horses ask them if you can take the manure from their oldest heaps.

    The reason is twofold - first, because the older material can be used quicker as it has already begun to decompose but also, as @skunker~ noted above, many horses are given a “deworming paste” once or twice a year and the residue in the manure can keep the worms away but it DOES deteriorate over a few months and if you are using the older manure heaps then the deworming paste is a moot point.

    To make a compost that can be used quickest, @Taoist Farmer had the best advice to construct yourself a hot compost heap. We have a “Backyard Composting” thread over in the Organics forum that I highly suggest checking out - Backyard Composting

    Again with the autumn leaves - collect ALOT - and also ALOT of manure - And any other kitchen produce waist or other organic matter that you can come up with and mix it all together in the back corner of your yard. Size does matter with a hot compost heap - I say 4’x4’x4’ or bigger for best results but check out the thread -

    And get yourself a good solid pitchfork. A shovel simply doesn’t cut it.

    J
     
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  14. my personal saying for years.. 'the more people i meet the more i love my dog" just gets even more and more true everyday that goes by.
    call me anti-social, i don't know, but except for my wife and a very few select friends I'd rather only have animals and plants around me. They don't cause me the stress and anxiety and frustration that people do to me.
     
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  15. If i did this in the fall? I love north. after winter all of this would be unfrozen, and when the ground thaws i could stir it up, it would be ready for growing before summer?

    I wouldnt dig into my pile and find ickyness that was frozen all year?

    Haha thanks for the read, I am trying to get into organics.




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  16. Yes and yes. Read through the Backyard Composting thread, make your compost this Fall and use it in the Spring.

    Easy Peasy.

    J
     
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