Please help coco coir/soil mix?

Discussion in 'Growing Organic Marijuana' started by Chil22, Apr 10, 2016.

  1. So I have 20 lbs of kind soil "hot soil", 2 bags of fox farm ocean forest, a huge block of Coco coir and a big sack of perlite.. I'm a total newbie at this but want to grow organic as I'm a medical patient I figured I'd mix the Coco with those soils so its not so strong on the plants, they are auto flowers i heard they do better in lower nutrient soil as well as higher porous soil .. So if I wanted to have 5 5 gallon buckets filled, how would I go about doing so.. .I was thinking about putting some rocks at bottom of bucket to help with drainage I also drilled some holes in such buckets, for the autos airy soil requirements.. Thank you very much guys
     
  2. Im not familiar with autos but heres my opinion- sounds like ur basically diluting your hot soil with coco coir, which is honestly what i would use if i was to dilute soil. If not coco coir, then peat moss or leaf mold. I personally would make sure between 10% and 35% of your soil is airation. Also might want to consider supplementing some calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate since coco tends to not let go of calcium.
    Also watch out for fungus gnats, they love that shit
     
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  3. Rocks at the bottom of your buckets will do nothing besides making your buckets heavy.

    And you'll lose soil space.

    J
     
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  4. Ive always thought that coco is too soggy without drainage, u disagree jerry? Or perhaps coco being mixed into soil somehow fixes the drainage problem? I apologize if i gave false information of any sort, but from what ive learned, from first hand experience with coco coir, and making soil from coco coir, lack of drainage/airation can cause a soggy medium deficient of oxygen.

    lovin u (=
     
  5. although i dont use coco in my soil, i think it has great properties as a water retainer AND drainage. honestly i think the stuff is quite remarkable because no matter how much you water coconut coir it will always remain drained and fluffy. almost impossible to over water in a 100% coir. it also has remarkable wicking power, and is not hydrophobic like peat moss when dry. too bad it has crappy CEC compared to peat but i think it might not be a bad idea to replace 5% or 10% of peat in a mix with coir just because of its ability to move water so well.
     
  6. ^^
     
  7. thank you,yes that's exactly what I'm doing. Should I throw some sand over soil for gnat flies? I did a bunch of research and there doesn't seem to be too much prevention (other than traps) and more remediation
     
  8. Holes were drilled into buckets for drainage/air figured the rocks at bottom would help air get into soil from bottom, I may be completely wrong lol like a suspended soil cake I guess
     
  9. . ^^^ thank you all for replies
     
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  10. That's a read hah, appreciate the spark notes. Explains why first post recomnneded calcium my question is if the soil has sufficient calcium that im mixin coir with should I still supplement?
     
  11. Aeration, like pumice, rice or buckwheat hulls or even perlite need to be mixed directly into the soil mix in order to help keep it fluffy so that oxygen can make its way to plant roots.

    All you'll do is lose space adding any kind of aeration component at the bottom of your pots.

    J
     
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  12. Sand has worked for me well! Well-sourced neem meal should work for fungas gnats and oodles of other pests. Havnt actually tried neem myself so i cant say for certain how well that works. Diatamecias earth (silica?) should work, but it could also killi insects that are benificial

    lovin u (=
     
  13. sounds great, I'll give the sand a whirl. One question though how can yoou tell when it's time to water if the sand dries quickly, I'd be touching dry sand. You guys know alot , thank you all for taking time to address my post
     
  14. Hmm iv only used it on straight coco, not soil yet. But with coco, the sand goes straight down into said coco, anytime u water anything over a mist lol. So you basically cant water it while the fungus gnats are still being seen, or even after that, but coco coir is able to hold water for a long time without drying out (when theres a layer of sand on top). I cant really speak to sand on actual soil, my apologies

    lovin u (=
     
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  15. IMO your best bet is to source Neem Cake from neemresource.com and sprinkle the surface of your soil with it. This will not only take care of the gnat problem but will also feed your soil.

    Yellow sticky traps work very well.

    A fan blowing across the surface of your pots works excellent. Gnats are not very good flyers and the fan doesn't allow them to settle on the surface of your soil.

    I would personally stay away from sand on the surface of your soil. That's just me though.

    J
     
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  16. will probably do neem cake, will also have fan running on it so that should help, Just worried about sand and watering, I like how the neem eliminates a problem in a beneficial way and I don't have the water issue to worry about. Once again thank you all..great support from you guys I'm sure I'll be coming up with some more questions in the future, hopefully I won't, hopefully it will just be experience and ill help people with that experience I got just like you guys did
     
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  17. I see a lot of times people saying place neem cake on your soil for fungus gnats. Well
    1 week after adding a neem topdress I still got fungus gnats. They live on and consume decaying organic matter, neem doesn't seem to be any different in my experience. Either i've got some resistant gnats, or....
    My best experience has been with Gnatrol, a biological pesticide that targets the larvae of fungus gnats that live in the soil. It is the same strain of Bacillis thuringiensis that is utilized with Mosquito Dunks.
     
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  18. I guess the mosquito dunks are for remediation? Of an established infestation?
     

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