Need an inexpensive fan switch thats controlled by temperature. Any thoughts?

Discussion in 'Grow Room Design/Setup' started by malufizzgig, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. I need an inexpensive switch to turn my inline fan on when it gets too hot and off after the room is cooled. I am disabled and on a fixed income, so I can't spend more than $50 on this, but I'd prefer to spend less. Looking at all the hydro supply stores and catalogs is overwhelming and most of the environmental controllers are far too complex and expensive. 
    Any thoughts? I'm no stranger to electricity, and I can build one if someone knows about a kit. 
     
    Thanks! This is such a great forum! Stay green!

     
  2. Ok if you are good with your hands you can get an regular old house (elecric heat with mercury) thermostat and take the mercury thing out and flip it around so it turns on when its hot. Sent from my SGH-I747M using Grasscity Forum mobile app
     
  3. Might be able to do that to one without the mercury Sent from my SGH-I747M using Grasscity Forum mobile app
     
  4. I must say if your not comfortable doing this kind of thing dont do it. Sent from my SGH-I747M using Grasscity Forum mobile app
     
  5. You could invest some time in learning and save money. You mentioned being familiar with electricity, but how about electronics? Here is a link to some info about a temperature sensor (TMP36 by Analog Devices) and how to interface it with an Arduino micro controller board. If you are unfamiliar with this stuff it would be well worth the time and effort to learn it, as it opens the door to endless affordable and custom solutions for controlling almost anything.I currently have 5 of these sensors throughout by box and control 4 fans and my 400W HPS all with an Arduino Uno. You could get an Arduino Mini for $15 and this sensor is $2. You would probably need a relay to switch the power to the fan which would probably be $5-$10, then you would just need to wire it up. So you could do this for under $30, but it may require some learning. You will have many unused pins left on your controller when you are done and it would be very easy to connect other things to control as well. Here is the link: http://learn.adafruit.com/tmp36-temperature-sensor/overview
     
  6. [quote name="BloK RoKn Beats" post="19396382" timestamp="1390542097"]You could invest some time in learning and save money. You mentioned being familiar with electricity, but how about electronics? Here is a link to some info about a temperature sensor (TMP36 by Analog Devices) and how to interface it with an Arduino micro controller board. If you are unfamiliar with this stuff it would be well worth the time and effort to learn it, as it opens the door to endless affordable and custom solutions for controlling almost anything.I currently have 5 of these sensors throughout by box and control 4 fans and my 400W HPS all with an Arduino Uno. You could get an Arduino Mini for $15 and this sensor is $2. You would probably need a relay to switch the power to the fan which would probably be $5-$10, then you would just need to wire it up. So you could do this for under $30, but it may require some learning. You will have many unused pins left on your controller when you are done and it would be very easy to connect other things to control as well. Here is the link: http://learn.adafruit.com/tmp36-temperature-sensor/overview[/quote]Thanks for the link there.. alway nice to get help even if im not the op Sent from my SGH-I747M using Grasscity Forum mobile app
     
  7. [quote name="Not Sure" post="19396951" timestamp="1390549338"]The problem with converting a thermostat is you need one that runs on 120v a/c, most of them run on 24v d/c.This is what I have... $35 http://www.westsidewholesale.com/lux-thermostats-win100.html[​IMG][/quote]Ill be checking that out tooSent from my SGH-I747M using Grasscity Forum mobile app
     
  8. I second the arduino tip. So handy all around!
     
  9. why not set it on a timer on intervals? or just let it run. my fans go 24/7.. air exchange is a good thing!
     

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