Lights too close

Discussion in 'Indoor Marijuana Growing' started by RecliningCough, Jul 10, 2018.

  1. And one more question - the damaged leaves will they recover or are they gonna die off - part two of question - if they are going to die off should I remove them ??- I dont have may big fan leaves as you can see
     
  2. Using COCO/PERLITE - indoor grow - Felt pots - General Organics GO Box starter - was going good till last feeding
    and last pest treatment (had thrips- gone now)
     
  3. This could be your problem too. If you let coco dry out like soil, the salt buildup will burn your plant. It causes all sorts of problems. Coco needs to stay damp at the very least and watered to 20% runoff EVERYTIME. I grow in coco and feed 2-3 times a day. Usually go from solo cup to one gallon pot and finish there if doing <5 week veg. Never in bigger than 3 gallon pots.
     
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  4. No i meant its allready made up in a spray bottle u dont mix any hold up ill send a pic of mine
     
  5. 20180711_180554.jpg
     
  6. I am in basement it stays very damp - it takes 2-3 days for soil to dry
    i get a small amount of run off each feeding - not around to feed but once a day working too much

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  7. Yes please or let me know the brand

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  8. I start in pete pellets once i see roots out the sides move to felt pots(2-3 weeks)
    I veg for a long time 8 weeks i top my plants at 6 weeks and make a clone from the top
    I flower for an additional 8 weeks - have not finished this cycle yet with first Dark Helmet gift plant only 2 weeks into flower

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  9. It’s not the air that drys the coco, it’s the roots drinking it up. That’s why you stay in small pots, and transplant only when packed with roots. It’s passive hydroponics.

    This plant spent 10 days in this solo cup from rooted clone. June 11th
    19426335-E5B6-41DE-899D-07A62FB4AAC3.jpeg


    Here she is July 6th.
    8EC32BDB-64DA-4D14-A710-FB4A57E5CC54.jpeg

    Fed twice a day and ready for transplant to 3 gallons and turn into a tree, or flower out in the one gallon with 3 or more feeds per day on my drip system

    Don’t think of coco as soil.
     
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  10. Yes - it is just a media to hold roots - I am sure now I must have over fed somehow - working on saving what I can - flushing now - I will not let them get as dry - but it was working fine till my last feeding... and I saw no yellowing like I am being told is normal for N overdose - all I got was browning, drying, curling leaves on all plants that got my last veg feed...
     
  11. Nitrogen overdose is dark green leaves and burning. Yellowing is nitrogen deficiency.

    You were treating like soil before, and getting soil results. Feed a 500 ppm solution (give or take) twice a day, in smaller pots next grow and see the difference in growth. Keep them in one gallons for a month, but you will HAVE to feed twice a day as they get thirsty. But you see how much growth in four weeks (in my pics above) can be achieved with this method.
     
  12. Ok I will try it
     
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  13. Well did some checking - general organics is 100% organic - not made from chicken

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  14. Since when are chickens not organic?
     
  15. Light distance is very subjective. There is no hard and fast rule for any certain light type even. It will depend on your power level as much as the light type. It will depend on what type of lens or reflector it has some. Low power leds like 65-120 watts can often get at close as 12" to plants with no ill effects. When you step up in power level to 250-300 watt range that minimum distance goes up a little to 14-16". Some plants I've had can't tolerate closer then about 18". Seedlings and small plants might want 30" from that same light to not get stress.

    This is always dependent on plant type as well and temp in the garden. It's not even usually the light that is the actual problem. It's usually the surface leaf temp the light creates that is the problem. For that reason heat stress and light too close stress pretty much produce the same leaf condition.
    This is the first sign to look for when your light is too close. When you see this leaf condition on the top of the plant move the light up.
    [​IMG]
     
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  16. 0711182112.jpg
    Heat stress.
    This might help.
    FB_IMG_1519598634695.jpg
     
  17. turned out to be nute burn - real bad - will be halving my nutes next time
    Yeah especially with LED they are all rated differently none of them accurate
     

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