how to decide when to transplant

Discussion in 'First Time Marijuana Growers' started by thatcelticsgame, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. cut'n'pasted from the end of another thread where it was somewhat off-topic.

    what's a good rule of thumb for when to transplant to a larger container? like a dimension ratio or something.

    the largest of the plants in this example is about 8 inches tall and 10 inches maximum leafspan. [ed: or at least it was the other day when i made the previous post, lol.]

    it's sitting in a truncated jug of about 6 inches diameter and 6 inches soil depth around the edges. probably about 5 inches deep in the middle as this jug style is recessed to allow stacking.

    the whole setup seems a bit a little top-heavy. how soon should it be moved into a 5-gallon bucket or something of that nature?

    (inb4 "after you're sure it's female") :p
     
  2. Rule of thumb I always see is 1gallon pot for each foot you want. 5' plant=5gallon pot
     

  3. should i infer, then, that if the plant is approaching 3/4 of a foot and the container is less than a 3/4 of a gallon, it's probably time to upgrade before growth becomes stunted?
     
  4. Ya I would definitely transplant, it's better to transplant before the roots have grown to the full size of their pot so while transplanting they don't get as much air, and their is still soil between air and roots and roots aren't just un-raveling from the pot hahaha
     

  5. much of the problem lies in having no idea how to estimate the root dimensions.
     
  6. *my best Arnold impression* Do it! DO IT NOW!
     
  7. Haha so I'm saying be safe and tranfer fucking early, maybe if you need germination to cup, then REALLY early to ground or biggest pot, or just fucking germination to ground and biggest pot. Not just fucking, Paper Towel>Red Solo CUP>Bigger pot, Bigger pot> bigger pot, etc. Fucking germinate it in a paper towel or whatever or throw her in a big ass pot... If you have to tranfer do it early as fuck though to be safe...
    Sorry for rambling, BAKED.
     
  8. You can also just straight germinate and put the plant in its final resting spot...on a 5 gallon though I would trans plant as thats alot of soil. I dont grow in 5 gallon pots 1,2, or 3 gallon airpots and I never bother doing anything else but germinate then final resting spot. Works like a charm everytime.
     
  9. That's what I'm talking about^^
     
  10. I am with rhapsody, transplanting is over rated and not needed really.

    That being said, the best way to me is to press gently on the sides of the pot or cup the plants are in. If firm, the plants have a decent root ball. If they give very easily, like lose soil, give them a bit longer.

    If they feel firm, I press gently around the sides and push up from the bottom about 1/4 to 1/2 inch to see if the soil is coming out as a solid mass. Doing that will tell you if its ready to come out but not screw it up or stunt the plant. If it appears to be breaking apart, just release the bottom and let it settle back in to the container.

    After a few grows you can just look at a plant and tell when it is ready.
     
  11. #11 thatcelticsgame, Aug 18, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 18, 2012
    definitely the way to go if you know in advance which of the little tadpoles will shed their helmets and pierce the surface, and which ones can't even be found in the soil a week later.
     

  12. do you mean "pull up" by reaching one's fingertips down into the bottom of the gaps created at the sides (by squeezing a circular mass of soil into an ellipse), or do you use pots with detachable bottoms?

    as this example involved a very disposable container, an improvised cutaway technique seems to have worked fine. will explain this if desired.
     

  13. I meant I germinate outside the soil then plant in there final resting spot. Now if I was growing in big 5 gallon buckets I might transplant. For the most part the whole reason why people transplant is normal agricultural methods. A tremendous amount of our crops nationwide are grown in green houses in small containers or rows of them and then the farmers transplant them into the ground.
     
  14. another transplant question for the gurus...

    The plant sends out a taproot to determine the depth of the medium, that stops growing when it hits the bottom. When transplanted, will it just start growing again when it feels new soil below it?

    Just wondering if transplanting just before the taproot hit the bottom of the solo cup would be beneficial, maybe hitting the bottom of the cup keeps it from growing for a while or something? Or would it just re-start/continue immediately in either case?
     
  15. Get some airpots!
     
  16. I'm gonna! I like starting in cups tho.
     
  17. [quote name='"thatcelticsgame"']

    do you mean "pull up" by reaching one's fingertips down into the bottom of the gaps created at the sides (by squeezing a circular mass of soil into an ellipse), or do you use pots with detachable bottoms?

    as this example involved a very disposable container, an improvised cutaway technique seems to have worked fine. will explain this if desired.[/quote]

    I use flexible pots, and literally push up on the bottom of the pot while losely holding the sides. If a good root ball is form the whole thing, plant included will push up.
     
  18. i saw one begin to form a flat spiral at that time, as if searching for an exit.

    oh okay. on the containers i was talking about, only the sides are flexible so this comment confused me somewhat.
     

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