good excuse?

Discussion in 'General' started by blazindrake, Aug 23, 2008.

  1. hey i know that if a cop asks to search your car you say no. and a good excuse for why is like you have to get home because you have to take a piss or your late or something..

    but what if you are just chilling in town with a backpack full of "herbal substances" and a cop asks to search it, i would say no, but what is a good excuse for saying no?

    i was just thinking about this and i cant think of something logical to say.
     
  2. the excuse would have to be
    you cant look in my shit because its MINE
    personal property
     
  3. lol dont carry a backpack full of ganj unless its only like a oz and dont look or act suscupicous
     

  4. no i just meant like 1/4 with a pipe and lighter and stuff in the backpack. not like 3 pounds of weed. lol.
     
  5. just say that your backpack is full of gay porn.
     
  6. Next time you do that, coat the inside of your backpack with horse shit.

    If he asks to search it, it'll be his surprise. :D
     
  7. LOL but what if the cop was gay
     
  8. Just say no.

    ...just say no to cops, lol.

    Ask him if he has probable cause, and see what reason he gives. If he has a reason, still tell him no and make him get a K9 unit to hit on your backpack before you let him search it.
    Constitutional rights, man, someone needs to use them.
     
  9. tell the cop u got porn magazine and ur embaressed and u dont want him to open it cuz u dont want ur friends to know...
    thats wat i said the cops laughed and left
     
  10. LOL. this reminds me of cops

    cop pulls over stupid crack head
    "can i search your car?"
    "yeah go ahead dawg i ainte be hidin shit man jsut on the grind cha know"
    "whats this"
    "thats a... i use that to take my perscibed meds dawg i have a bad leg dawg"
    "well this tested positive for crack"

    JUST TELL THE NO
    ive had it happen
    they dont take it personally
    its not liek they are like ok sense you wont let me search it im going to call swat
    they pretty much just find a really dumb reason to give you a ticket and your on your way
     
  11. #11 wackdeafboy, Aug 23, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 23, 2008
    excuses are for assholes

    plus, always say no to cops
     
  12. Personally I would say I share the car with my brother and that I wouldn't want to subject his things to search without his permission.
     
  13. just tell em no i dont submit to any searches and then ask if your being detained or arrested for anything. if he says no, tell him to have a nice day and walk away.
     
  14. know your rights mane...tell them you dont authorize any unwarranted searches of your things, and would like a better explanation of why this is happening in the first place..that'll throw them off sometimes. i wouldnt recommend using exuses...cops usually can sort bullshit from the truth.

    whats funny is the premise of probable cause always works in the cops favor. Because "smell" falls under that category.

    obviously you can't tell anyone what they did or did not smell..its virtually unarguable.

    be sneaky.
     
  15. There is no good excuse, theyve probably heard it all before.

    One good loophole tho, is if you happen to have your car under your parents name. In that case, its not yours and you cant give them permission to search someone elses property.

    But yea.. their pretty good at telling if your hiding something
     
  16. but their mere "feeling" that your holding something is not enough
    they need some kind of evidence that would stand up in court, and not submitting to a search is your right so they cant use it against you in court. they can just say oh i just randomly thought they might have weed either.

    now im not 100% on any of this im not a lawyer but as far as i know
     
  17. Your right. But they can use tells and they way you carry yourself against you. Along with anything youve said. Especially if its consistant with someone whos lying. And how would you answer to "if you dont have anything to hide, why cant i check? "am i being detained?" wont cut it there. Theyll hold your ass as long as they can if they think your up to something and unfortunatly, with the ends justify the means mentality of the court system, your fucked if they cops feel youve been giving them a hard time
     
  18. its my understanding, and according to http://flexyourrights.org/ that unless you are being detained or arrested, you are allowed to terminate any interaction with the police at any time. (except for certain circumstances im guessing ie you witnessed a murder or something... anyway..) also, you are not required to even answer any of their questions, so you should have to incriminate yourself. just stick to the no, being detained? and be on your way if the answer is anything but yes. :p

    again, this is how i think it works
     
  19. Traffic Stop Scenario

    \t \t\t[​IMG] \t \t \t\tScene from BUSTED \t In any given traffic stop, with a few notable exceptions, the below rules will help protect your civil rights and improve your chances of driving away safely-so you don't have to be a legal expert to say and do the right thing. 1) Keep Your Private Items Out of View
    This is common sense: Always keep any private items that you don't want others to see out of sight. Legally speaking, police do not need a search warrant in order to confiscate any illegal items that are in plain view.
    2) Be Courteous & Non-Confrontational
    If you are pulled over, the first thing you should to do is turn your car off, turn the dome light on (if it's nighttime), roll down the window, and keep your hands on the steering wheel. Don't immediately reach into your glove compartment for your license and registration. Officers want to be able to see your hands for their own safety. Wait until the officer asks to see your paperwork before retrieving your documents.
    The first thing you should say to the officer is, "Hello officer. Can you tell me why I am being pulled over?" The officer may give you a hard time or say, "Why do you think I pulled you over?" Tell the officer you don't know. Most importantly, do not apologize after you get stopped, because that can be considered an admission of guilt and could be used against you later in court.
    Show your identification if it's requested. Be respectful and non-confrontational. Refer to the police as "Sir," "Ma'am," or "Officer." Remain calm and quiet while the officer is reviewing your documents. If the officer writes you a ticket, accept it quietly and never complain. Listen to any instruction on paying the fine or contesting the ticket, and drive away slowly.
    3) Just Say "No" to Warrantless Searches
    \tWarning: If a police officer asks your permission to search, you are under no obligation to consent. The only reason he's asking you is because he doesn't have enough evidence to search without your consent. If you consent to a search request you give up one of the most important constitutional rights you have-your Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable searches and seizures.
    A majority of avoidable police searches occur because citizens naively waive their Fourth Amendment rights by consenting to warrantless searches. As a general rule, if a person consents to a warrantless search, the search automatically becomes reasonable and therefore legal. Consequently, whatever an officer finds during such a search can be used to convict the person.
    Don't expect a police officer to tell you about your right not to consent. Police officers are not required by law to inform you of your rights before asking you to consent to a search. In addition, police officers are trained to use their authority to get people to consent to a search, and most people are predisposed to comply with any request a police officer makes. For example, the average motorist stopped by a police officer who asks them, "Would you mind if I search your vehicle, please?" will probably consent to the officer's search without realizing that they have every right to deny the officer's request.
    If, for any reason you don't want the officer digging through your belongings, you should refuse to consent by saying something like, "Officer, I know you want to do your job, but I do not consent to any searches of my private property." If the officer still proceeds to search you and finds illegal contraband, your attorney can argue that the contraband was discovered through an illegal search and hence should be thrown out of court.
    You should never hesitate to assert your constitutional rights. Just say "no!"
    4) Determine if You Can Leave
    You have the right to terminate an encounter with a police officer unless you are being detained under police custody or have been arrested. The general rule is that you don't have to answer any questions that the police ask you. This rule comes from the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which protects you against self-incrimination. If you cannot tell if you are allowed to leave, say to the officer, "I have to be on my way. Am I free to go?"
    If the officer says "Yes," tell him to have a nice day, and leave immediately. If the officer's answer is ambiguous, or if he asks you another unrelated question, persist by asking "am I being detained, or can I go now?" If the officer says "No," you are being detained, and you may be placed under arrest. If this is the case, reassert your rights as outlined above, and follow Rules #5 and #6.
    5) Do Not Answer Questions without Your Attorney Present
    There is no reason to worry that your failure to answer the officer's questions will later be used against you. The truth is just the opposite: Anything you say can, and probably will, be used against you.
    In just about any case imaginable, a person is best off not answering any questions about his involvement in anything illegal. Assert your Fifth and Sixth Amendment rights by saying these exact words: "Officer, I have nothing to say until I speak with a lawyer."
    *Remember- If you do choose to answer any of the officer's questions, always be honest. Police are not easily tricked and will often become hostile if they feel disrespected. If you feel it is best not to answer truthfully, then don't say anything at all.
    6) Do Not Physically Resist
    If the police proceed to detain, search, or arrest you despite your wishes-do not physically resist. You may state clearly but non-confrontationally: "Officer, I am not resisting arrest and I do not consent to any searches." Or you may assert your rights by simply saying nothing until you can speak with an attorney.


    Street Stop Scenario

    \t \t\t[​IMG] \t \t \t\tScene from BUSTED \t In any given public police encounter, with a few notable exceptions, the below rules will help protect your civil rights and improve your chances of leaving safely-so you don't have to be a legal expert to say and do the right thing. 1) Keep Your Private Items Out of View
    This is common sense: Always keep any private items that you don't want others to see out of sight. Legally speaking, police do not need a search warrant in order to confiscate any illegal items that are in plain view.
    2) Be Courteous & Non-Confrontational
    If you are stopped by a police officer, remain calm. Don't ever -- under any circumstances -- talk back or raise your voice to a police officer. You have nothing to gain -- and everything to lose -- by escalating the hostility level of the encounter.
    Even if the officers are being belligerent it's always in your best interest to remain calm, courteous and non-confrontational.
    3) Determine the Reason You Have Been Stopped
    Police may initiate a conversation with any citizen for any reason, however they may not detain you without "reasonable suspicion" that you are engaged in criminal activity. Ask the officer: "Why am I being stopped?" If the officer does not indicate that you are suspected of a specific crime, then this is a casual stop and you should be allowed to terminate the encounter at any time.
    If the officer indicates that you are suspected of criminal activity, you are being detained. At this stage, the officer is attempting to find evidence on which to establish probable cause necessary to arrest you. Steps #4, #5, and #6 become extremely important at this point.
    4) Just Say "No" to Warrantless Searches
    \tWarning: If a police officer asks your permission to search, you are under no obligation to consent. The only reason he's asking you is because he doesn't have enough evidence to search without your consent. If you consent to a search request you give up one of the most important constitutional rights you have-your Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable searches and seizures.
    A majority of avoidable police searches occur because citizens naively waive their Fourth Amendment rights by consenting to warrantless searches. As a general rule, if a person consents to a warrantless search, the search automatically becomes reasonable and therefore legal. Consequently, whatever an officer finds during such a search can be used to convict the person.
    Don't expect a police officer to tell you about your right not to consent. Police officers are not required by law to inform you of your rights before asking you to consent to a search. In addition, police officers are trained to use their authority to get people to consent to a search, and most people are predisposed to comply with any request a police officer makes. For example, the average motorist stopped by a police officer who asks them, "Would you mind if I search your vehicle, please?" will probably consent to the officer's search without realizing that they have every right to deny the officer's request.
    If, for any reason you don't want the officer digging through your belongings, you should refuse to consent by saying something like, "Officer, I know you want to do your job, but I do not consent to any searches of my private property." If the officer still proceeds to search you and finds illegal contraband, your attorney can argue that the contraband was discovered through an illegal search and hence should be thrown out of court.
    You should never hesitate to assert your constitutional rights. Just say "no!"
    5) Determine if You Can Leave
    You have the right to terminate an encounter with a police officer unless you are being detained under police custody or have been arrested. The general rule is that you don't have to answer any questions that the police ask you. This rule comes from the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which protects you against self-incrimination. If you cannot tell if you are allowed to leave, say to the officer, "I have to be on my way. Am I free to go?"
    If the officer says "Yes," tell him to have a nice day, and leave immediately. If the officer's answer is ambiguous, or if he asks you another unrelated question, persist by asking "am I being detained, or can I go now?" If the officer says "No," you are being detained, and you may be placed under arrest. If this is the case, reassert your rights as outlined above, and follow Rules #6 and #7.
    6) Do Not Answer Questions without Your Attorney Present
    There is no reason to worry that your failure to answer the officer's questions will later be used against you. The truth is just the opposite: Anything you say can, and probably will, be used against you.
    In just about any case imaginable, a person is best off not answering any questions about his involvement in anything illegal. Assert your Fifth and Sixth Amendment rights by saying these exact words: "Officer, I have nothing to say until I speak with a lawyer."
    *Remember- If you do choose to answer any of the officer's questions, always be honest. Police are not easily tricked and will often become hostile if they feel disrespected. If you feel it is best not to answer truthfully, then don't say anything at all.
    7) Do Not Physically Resist
    If the police proceed to detain, search, or arrest you despite your wishes-do not physically resist. You may state clearly but non-confrontationally: "Officer, I am not resisting arrest and I do not consent to any searches." Or you may assert your rights by simply saying nothing until you can speak with an attorney.

    .....from flexyourrights.org
     
  20. #20 skittles, Aug 24, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 24, 2008
    yes im well aware of all that stuff, but its not that simple. If it was, ide tell them fuck fuckoff everytime.

    Unfortunatly, they have all kids of sneaky crap they can pull. They love to claim they thought you had a weapon because if they claim they felt threatened, theres basically no limit to what they can do.

    Your really best avoiding these situations entirely. Find a good hiding spot in your car and dont walk around sketchy areas with something on you. The way you talk to them and dress comes into play to.

    Im not advocating submitting to police, just trying to give some good hints from from lots of experiance.


    One other good thing ive discovered, is when you get pulled over, have your license, registration and insurance ready when he comes to your window. this shows you werent spending the minute or so you had trying to hide something and your willing to comply.
     

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