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Cooking Spices and Your High

Discussion in 'Fitness, Health & Nutrition' started by Storm Crow, Jul 4, 2021.

  1. This relatively short article has info on how our cooking spices can affect our endocannabinoid system, which in turn may possibly increase your high a bit! :GettingStoned: Chocolate, curcumin, chili peppers and other dietary ingredients are briefly covered.

    A Neglected Link Between the Psychoactive Effects of Dietary Ingredients and Consciousness-Altering Drugs. (USA) (full – 2019) A Neglected Link Between the Psychoactive Effects of Dietary Ingredients and Consciousness-Altering Drugs

    "Herbal supplements, medicinal plants, and foods have been reasonably well studied in terms of their effects on cognition and mood and their interactions with therapeutic drugs [e.g., Refs. (37, 38)]. Yet, to my knowledge, the peer reviewed literature contains few, if any, studies of how dietary ingredients may affect the peak, duration, or quality of the experience produced by cannabis".


    Granny :wave:
     
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  2. thnx granny:)
     
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  3. I’ve eaten chocolate before smoking and after and had no effects on the high it didn’t get stronger or weaker …
    Who researches is this topic ? I’d like ways to make it stronger Witt natural herbs …
     
  4. @Ultramaxx Who researches this topic? Here's what I do to find out more-

    First, I click on the name of the authors - this usually will bring up other articles they have written. Often the authors will have several similar articles published. However, this particular study is unusual in having just the one author who has a broad interest in neuroscience. So not much help there, this time.

    Then I check out the studies that were cited down at the bottom of the article. (This is where I sometimes end up "going down the research rabbit hole"!)

    FYI- PubMed is always free but often just gives you abstracts (always click the DOI #). Google Scholar is free and gives you a choice of links which may lead to the abstracts or full studies. CrossRef is 3rd choice- it seemed to usually lead to paywalled versions, so I don't bother with it.

    Here's some of the first 10 cited studies that looked interesting, but there were a couple dozen more that I didn't even look at.

    3. Bourgeois JA, Parthasarathi U, Hategan A. Taking the spice route: psychoactive properties of culinary spices. Curr Psychiatry (2014) 13(4):21–32.

    Google Scholar

    4. Gertsch J. Cannabimimetic phytochemicals in the diet—an evolutionary link to food selection and metabolic stress adaptation? Br J Pharmacol (2017) 174(11):1464–83. doi: 10.1111/bph.13676

    PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

    5. Russo EB. Beyond cannabis: plants and the endocannabinoid system. Trends Pharmacol Sci (2016) 37(7):594–605. doi: 10.1016/j.tips.2016.04.005

    PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar


    10. di Tomaso E, Beltramo M, Piomelli D. Brain cannabinoids in chocolate. Nature (1996) 382(6593):677–8. doi: 10.1038/382677a0

    PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar


    Granny :wave:
     
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  5. Thank You Beautiful @Storm Crow Good Info Again Legend.



    ~Toni~
     

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