Completely starting over

Discussion in 'Growing Organic Marijuana' started by Dseb0127, Jun 8, 2019.

  1. So after non stop reading and careful consideration I’ve started a compost pile and am not growing anything that isn’t completely organic. Also switching to rain water. Not really for the no chemical reason you usually hear but that is a part of it I mean why smoke it if you don’t have to. Spent a lot of time in @mountainorganic no till thread and just got really into reading about organic growing after that. A big problem I was having was I don’t have a lot of extra income to put into this I just grow for myself and try to use what I have on hand but wow did I not realize how much I had on hand. Always on amazon/eBay etc. looking up all these things I simply could not afford, well hello organics. I have a rabbit who’s poop and wood bedding was just tossed in the field, into the compost pile you go! Really got excited after reading about rabbit poop as fertilizer and how good it actually is, so I made a tea let it steep for a couple days until the poo was all broken down added a half cup to a gallon of water and watered my plant thats already in organic soil and it exploded with lush healthy green growth. This plant was severely overheated and completely stunted for a week and now it’s healthier than it ever was. I just made up two pots with a store bought organic soil added perlite and rabbit poo right into the soil, I’m going to let it sit and let the Nitrogen come down (since the manure is so high in it, although I’ve read it’s not really necessary but can burn roots if fresh manure touches roots) a little while waiting on my compost to be ready then add compost and I’ll be ready to start growing again. I’m going to start a couple bagseeds to experiment with while waiting for compost, grown in organic potting soil with rabbit poo teas for fert and see how well they do. Also read that Spanish moss can be made into a tea for flower since its acts like a sponge and absorbs a lot of P and K so I’m going to try some of that as well since I can’t feed the rabbit poo tea in flower due to high N. Hopefully have a little compost ready to add to some tea as well. Sorry this got so scatter brained just super excited about lowering my carbon footprint in the pursuit for meds all while spending almost no money. (Outside in pots) to sum up if you’re a new grower and you’re really tight on funds, start reading about organic growing and you’ll be amazed at how much your stomach unclenches thinking about money. A ton of the shit you throw away can be used to feed your babies, and feed them well. Can’t wait to have soil teeming with life as my microbes and fungi nurture my plants to their absolute greatest potential. All that being said if you grow or have grown organically and have any comments or advice I love to learn new things. Happy Growing everyone!
     
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  2. Welcome aboard! Since you have a compost pile started, start checking it for worms and collecting the ones you find. Just store em in a bucket in the shade with some bunny poop and bedding and you have worm bin. You can figure out a better set up later, but just start now. When trying to organic garden on the cheap, its all about getting stuff started ahead of time. A big part to organic gardening is hunting and gathering free stuff to use sooner or later.
    cheers
    os
     
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  3. You recommend removing the worms from the pile? I was considering a worm bin but just figured they’d leave castings in the compost, but I can see the benefits of having some extra separate castings on hand. Now I have a project for tomorrow! Thanks for the advice!
     
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  4. Welcome man!! Glad you came over to the dark side! Dark rich soil that is! Rabbit poop is an awesome compost and worm bin ingredient! I’m hoping to buy 200lbs of it next week for cheap.

    You can also grow or wild harvest ingredients for chop and drop or I dry Comfrey leaves out and grind that into a meal for use in teas, soil mixing, top dressing, etc. I just spent $10 on organic banana’s and brown sugar for a flowering fertilizer. Most bottles of the same thing are $45+ a liter while I made a half gal for $10, not to shabby.

    I’m pulling up a chair! Your plants are going to be nice!


    “You are unlimited!”
    Prepper420’s No-Tillin Adventure!
     
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  5. Thanks I’m definitely hoping so. I’m actually having a ton of fun learning about all the different amendments there’s so many natural things that are good for your plants and I live next to the ocean so my next beach trip is going to more about collecting goodies than sun!
     
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  6. it reads like you're on the right track right out of the gate @Dseb0127. i can only concur that rabbit scat is undeniably one of the best natural manures a person could add to the garden or to a container plant. if the rabbits are living large they're eating well and hopefully that includes alfalfa. no biggie if not it's still good sheet without it mahn.

    no matter where a person lives they should check their native tree species to ensure any leaves used in the compost pile dont contain juglone. it's a natural substance found in some trees and it's toxic to most plant species. most walnut trees, black walnut specifically, butternut, hickory, pecan, and a few others. check that out if your collecting leaves for the bin. but quite frankly a well prepared leaf compost and good rabbit scat and you're 2/3 there to effortless growing. besides kelp and good quality rock dusts you probably dont need anything else except tap water. read your providers annual water safety report to find important information about your water for use with a container plant. it's mandatory imo and good info down the line. water affects soil chemistry in a big way beside just providing solubility and O2.

    personally i recommend you shy away from gathering stuff off the beach to use. at least for a while. the quality of those scavaged "things" are of dubious quality imo. norwegian kelp is your best and safest choice. just be careful with beach combing and back water foraging unless you plan on pretreating really well to get the Na levels down and then run it through the compost pile. there's plenty of much, much better quality alternatives with zero risk. the kelp you want is ascophllum nodustrum. it's very unique and special and absolutely worth working into your budget imo.

    welcome aboard the grow train grow-bro. you've found your way to the best of the net for sharing cannabis growing knowledge and experience. there are a lot of very experienced organic growers, and some purists, that post around here, myself being an exception. i'm a "keep it really, really, simple, less-is-best, relaxed grower" so my style does depart from some of the oft recommended routines. i only grow 4 plants for personal use so i can eliminate a lot of the grow mojo and majik that seemingly hovers around orgainic cannabis cultivation. i'm my best customer and the only one to please :smoke:

    cheerios and bountiful harvests. :smoking:
     
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  7. Thanks possum I appreciate it. It’s good to know like the grocery store the store brand isn’t always ok sometimes you’ve gotta go name brand. One of the things on my need to get soon list was kelp so that’s good to know. I’ve just gotta keep learning but with the help of GC that’s not a problem!
     
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  8. Compost worms will populate and repopulate that pile quickly. You will never be able to catch all the little ones, so there should always be a nice population in the pile no matter how many you take for a worm bin. A worm bin for extra castings and the off seasons will treat you very well.
    cheers
    os
     
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  9. I figured that’s what you meant just wanted to make sure!
     
  10. I've been wanting to do a worm bin but out of concern about wintertime, and other immediate matters at the time I ended up for the moment going with a "standard" compost pile.
    What do you do with a worm bin during winter? no way i can bring something like that inside the house. does the compost they live in in the bins stay warm enough inside to leaves the bins outside during winter?
    right now I using a big 105 gal compost bin and throwing kitchen scrapes, garden pruning / trim matter, shredded newspapers for the pile
     
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  11. #11 killset, Jun 8, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
    My worm bins are a little bit different then most. I don't have the time to maintain a regular worm bin do to my schedule. I killed a couple worm farms do to my neglagence. This isn't a technique only for people with busy schedules though. It's a simple easy to maintain method that doesn't take up much space and can be hidden out of view. Plus, I dont have to worry about keeping the environment safe for the worms as mother nature does that for me.

    I take 5 gallon buckets and drill lots of holes in the side all over. I use lids on the buckets to keep animals out and then bury them in the yard. Leaving just a couple inches above the ground so I came remove the lid and easily get inside. I have 1 next to my compost pile and a couple under bushes. Keep them in the shade. I put organic material in the buckets the worms come in from my yard, feed and leave castings behind. I build up enough supply during warm months to make it through winter. The added bonus is the buckets also feed the nearby bushes and plants with the leachate left behind as it drains out.

    For some reason worms love melon. Pretty much any type of melon. It's like a homing beacon for worms. The buckets always have worms in them as long as I keep putting in material but if one slows up for some reason we eat a juicy watermelon or whatever and put the rinds in the bucket. By the next day there's usually a huge ball of worms all over the rind. What I like about this method is when I'm gone for work and not able to maintain adding material to it the worms don't die. They simply go back into the ground, leaving their castings behind until I'm able to add material. The reason I mentioned Mellon rinds earlier is because when I get back home I'll add a melon rind to a neglected bucket that went dormant in my absence and boom it's up and running again quickly.
     
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  12. This is actually a really good idea man! Never thought about doing it that way, I’ve always drilled a bunch of holes in totes or used a 100gal pot for indoor worm farms. Will prolly do this for my Comfrey patch!
     
  13. I have an exciting update, after only 3 days my compost pile is hot!!! I was worried because it’s pretty small since I’m only ever gonna have about 4 plants max for awhile anyway, but it’s 85 today I can still feel the heat through the tarp. Dead leaves, tons of rabbit poo, cedar bedding, pine needles and assorted fruits and veggie scraps and dumped a rabbit poo tea on it for a little boost. Working some kelp in as soon as possible. It’s absolutely teeming with life already. Also one of my little experiment bagseeds is about to pop soil today. All in all I’ve got to say, today was a good day.
     
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  14. Not the best pic. Dropped my phone a couple days ago and now my camera only works in selfie mode. I use the top of a 2nd bucket to make it easier for my kids to get the top off to collect ewcs. I think I used a 3/8 or 1/2 inch bit to drill the holes. Also have a few holes above the ground to allow air exchange. Its pushing 90°f but it's nice and cool in the bucket, even after having trimmed the Bush it's under so the sunlight does hit it some until the Bush grows back. This is my "overflow" bucket for when I have to much to compost in my other buckets that are in my garden so theres not much in it right now. My other buckets are pretty much full
     

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  15. Cool thread folks. I’m always in ABC mode. Always Be Composting.
     
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  16. Definitely borrowing this idea. Thanks for sharing.
     
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  17. Melon and pumpkin rinds are like crack to worms. They are a great 'baiting tool' for catching worms in a compost pile, or for removing the worms from a bin. The majority of the worms will migrate right under the rind, and hang out, just ripe for the picking. Even if you bury a rind in a leaf pile under a tree, you will have worms a day or two later. I have a couple bins loaded with rinds on one side that I am using to remove as many worms as possible from. You never get em all, but it works slick. In tray units you don't have to bother with baiting.
    cheers
    os
     
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  18. Totally agree. I can have zero worms in a bucket one day, add a rind and they can't help themselves. I make sure to have rinds available when i start my buckets each spring. I'm an avid fisherman so rinds come in handy when I need bait also. Our pumpkins always end up in the compost pile or worm bucket too.
     
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  19. I am raising pumpkins just for worms this year!
    cheers
    os
     
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  20. Just a little something I thought I’d share about this epic failure of a grow lol (and the magic of rabbit manure) but tons of lessons learned, and really is a pictorial almost of me learning while really just fucking up lol anyway this plants been through hell. I started with 3 bagseeds in miracle gro that had been sitting for about 5 years in the backyard they grew like shit and looked like shit for obvious reasons. I saved up got better soil and some perlite and I transplanted. Didn’t water enough and they were out all day in 90+ degrees so long story short I lost 2 and this last one stunted for 2 weeks. I decided I was going to try to nurse it back to health as a learning experience using only organic products mainly rabbit poop. Well I fed it rabbit poo tea every other watering and also worked some pellets in the soil and sprayed the leaves every other day. So it was starting grow really nice and strong again and looked extremely healthy so I figured let’s flower it and see what happens. I left it in the dark for 24 hours then started 12/12. This was 3 days ago i think it’s showing sex already and I’m pretty sure I have my first female. I’ll add some pictures of the life cycle of this plant so far. Just goes to show how resilient these plants really are. This thing really took a beating and while it may not be a masterpiece by any means it was an extremely valuable learning experience for me and I’m lookin forward to finally getting into a flowering stage and getting hands on experience with this part of the grow. So here (she?) is the lone survivor. My second grow for everyone to see (be gentle I learned a lot lol)

    The shaky miracle gro, no drainage start, and my first lst attempt. [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Transplant morning into Kellogg organic potting mix and perlite (doomsday)[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Transplant afternoon after having wet leaves and not enough water in extreme heat [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    So they were in pretty bad shape dead leaves all over so I cut off all the dead and damaged leaves to try to salvage everything. Went from something that looked a lot worse than this [​IMG]

    To this [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    I wish I had documented more in between here but I didn’t. So two stunted beyond repair and went to the compost pile. The survivor showed signs of life finally and became this Frankenstein looking thing here [​IMG]
    Look at the difference in colors and just overall health you can really see a huge transition from start to now of just not knowing shit to still not knowing shit but getting there lol

    So that brings us to my final picture of what I hope is my first female, I’ll know for sure in a couple days but here’s what it looks like today [​IMG]

    Well I hope you enjoy my failures everyone. I look forward to making a journal once my compost is finished and I order some feminized seeds for the first time, but hard lessons first. Happy to be able to see I’m progressing though.
     
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