Companion plants and cover crops.

Discussion in 'Growing Organic Marijuana' started by WeeDroid, Jan 13, 2012.

  1. Hi folks, :)

    I've been meaning to start this topic for a while. I'm hoping folks here won't mind if we include plants other than cannabis, and gardens that are edible as well as smokeable.

    This is also very open to either indoor gardens as well as outdoor gardens. I don't see a lot of companion growing going on for indoors gardens but one never knows.

    Allow me to start please. I will be growing white clover and bahia grass as cover crops for my large, no till indoor beds. Two primary reasons are an increased as well as established, endo fungal network for my cannabis to tap into when I transplant young vegging plants into the flower bed. In addition, the nitrogen fixing abilities of these two plants is very appealing.

    A question I have is; does anyone now how much light i need to give these two grasses? Obviously I would like to just use fluro tubes rather than my HIDs.

    I also invite discussion of companion planting ideas in general, and what, if any, companion plants are good for cannabis growing outdoors.
     
  2. Cool thread idea, I'm sub'd in!
     
  3. Where are you at with your project Wee Droid? Are the pots filled yet? MIW
     
  4. Hey MIW. Nope, pots not filled yet. I still have a 2nd batch of compost to whip up. I'll probably start late March or so.
     
  5. Awesome thread Wee!! Bahia has made itself quite at home where I live-most people don't like it because it jumped the agricultural fence and invaded lawns. I can say this much from an outdoor standpoint. It's very shade tolerant and tough to get rid of(if you choose to). The good points are how awesome it is for compost heaps, fresh cut or dried. I let one 1/4 acre garden plot on my property go wild with it each fall, and pull the straw with a hard rake in mid- winter and blend into the compost pile. If you get a good crop of it going indoors, you will be pleasantly surprised at how it will stoke your compost tumbler. You'll probably have no need for alfalfa anymore.
     
  6. #6 WeeDroid, Jan 15, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 15, 2012
    As far as links on clover go, you can find those just as quickly as I can. There is a search function here and it works pretty damn well. Google works really well and then there is always wikipedia. :)

    In other words, I don't have any links at the tips of my fingers and I don't feel like searching for them atm.

    Since I am planning a long term, no till indoor gardening bed, Trichoderma has little interest for me. From what very little I have read, Trichoderma may be useful for people doing more standard indoor grows, especially if they are not reusing their soil mix.
     
  7. I hope you will post some pics of the cover crop grow Wee. I'd love to see what bahia looks like grown indoors. As for the white clover, is there something unique about it compared to crimson or or standard green clover?
     
  8. Hey poppy. You bet! :) My grow journal will be very well documented, just like my soil crafts topic is.

    LD recommended white clover, so I went with that, rather than spending hours researching a subject I'm not all that good at yet.
     
  9. #9 SkunkPatronus, Jan 15, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 15, 2012
    Do my mushrooms count?

    Oh, and chia. I have done chia pot too.
     
  10. Hemp \tCannabis sativa L. subsp. sativa \tBrassica (cabbage, brussels sprouts, other kales) \t\t\t\t\tRepels many types of beetles which attack cabbages.
     
  11. ^^^^^
    from wikipedia's List of companion plants - Herbs section
     
  12. Dankohzee's thread also recommends a few plants- thistle or artichoke are one, there might be more
     
  13. marigolds are pretty and they prevent root nematodes.. that's all i can think of now
     
  14. Thanks to the one who sent me to ICMag to read. MadL's post about living mulches.
    They then pointed me in the direction of vendor named OutsidePride to buy my white miniclover about which is said:
    Between around 8 inches tall. White Miniclover Seed Miniclover has one of the smallest leaf blades of any clover. This is the best clover to use when adding a clover to a lawn to help fixate nitrogen and keep the lawn healthy. It is not aggressive like White Dutch Clover .
     
  15. #16 hope2toke, Jan 15, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 15, 2012
    good info, urlove. How are your plants going? are you planning a no-till garden?
     
  16. Apparently miniclover does well in shady areas; but it is apparently sold out.
     
  17. #18 hope2toke, Jan 15, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 15, 2012
    it does well because we're spacing our plants more instead of growing for fiber. clover wouldn't stand a chance if the plants weren't spaced. I got 4 lbs of clover for $8 at a local feed shop. looking at the sowing instructions it says sow any time outside- I think I'll wait until I have my garden beds in place and sow a clover/wildflower mix. doing the mound raised bed thing tuesday. I have a lead on free rotted logs and horse manure. I dont know if it's all organic but maybe Ill ask about it before I do the whole trip
     
  18. Thank you for asking hope2toke!
    It's lonely here for me in this new city. I moved away from the farm
    So I miss all the woods and quiet.
    My plants are happy,warm and giving me a very nice reason to do all this research. Its been a long time since I graduated from farming college; but the red neck in me got to do something useful.
    Thanks again you all have been so kind!
     
  19. never heard too much about growing anything other than bud indoors or other tropical plants
    id be interested to see your restults

    here is some other info to look
    into for organic growing some you may already know of

    permaculture
    food forest - seven layers
    hugelkultur
    sepp holzer - farming with nature
    aquaponics
    walipini greenhouse's
    fiber optic skylights(expensive but kinda cool, not too relevant just thought id post it)


    pretty interesting info on organic growing...
     
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