an interesting read

Discussion in 'Medical Marijuana Usage and Applications' started by highawatha, Sep 6, 2003.

  1. Fact Sheet: Medical Marijuana
    Marijuana's therapeutic uses are well documented in modern scientific literature
    for treating patients with illnesses such as AIDS, glaucoma, cancer,
    multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and chronic pain.

    In 1978 New Mexico lawmakers passed the first medical marijuana
    law, the Lynn Pierson Act, named for a 26-year-old cancer patient.
    Currently the law allows marijuana to be used to relieve nausea associated
    with chemotherapy and to ease eye pressure from glaucoma
    in connection with a research project. More than 250 people used
    marijuana under the law until 1986, when lawmakers ceased funding the program.

    Between 1996 and 2000, eight states passed voter initiatives legalizing the medicinal
    use of cannabis (AZ, CA, ME, OR, WA, NV, CO and AK), and one state, Hawaii,
    legalized medicinal use through legislation signed by Governor Caetano on June
    12, 2000.

    The Congressionally chartered Institute of Medicine's 1999 report on medical
    marijuana stated, "The accumulated data indicate a potential
    therapeutic value for cannabinoid drugs, particularly for symptoms such as pain
    relief, control of nausea and vomiting, and appetite stimulation."


    The Institute of Medicine's 1999 report on medical marijuana examined the
    question whether the medical use of marijuana would lead to an increase
    of marijuana use in the general population and concluded that,
    "At this point there are no convincing data to support this concern.
    The existing data are consistent with the idea that this would not be a
    problem if the medical use of marijuana were as closely regulated as other
    medications with abuse potential.”

    The Institute of Medicine's 1999 report on medical marijuana examined the
    question of whether marijuana could diminish patients' immune system
    - an important question when considering marijuana use by AIDS and cancer
    patients. The report concluded that, "the short-term immunosuppressive
    effects are not well established but, if they exist, are not likely great
    enough to preclude a legitimate medical use."

    In spite of the established medical value of marijuana, doctors are presently permitted
    to prescribe cocaine and morphine - but not marijuana.

    A few of the editorial boards that have endorsed medical access to marijuana include:
    Albuquerque Journal; Boston Globe; Chicago Tribune; Miami Herald;
    New York Times; Orange County Register; and USA Today.

    Many organizations have favorable positions (e.g., unimpeded research) on medical
    marijuana. These groups include: The Institute of Medicine, The American Cancer
    Society; American Medical Association; Australian Commonwealth Department of
    Human Services and Health; California Medical Association; Federation of
    American Scientists; Florida Medical Association; and the National Academy of
    Sciences.

    On September 6, 1988, the Drug Enforcement Administration's Chief Administrative
    Law Judge, Francis L. Young, ruled: "In strict medical terms marijuana is
    far safer than many foods we commonly consume. For example, eating 10 raw
    potatoes can result in a toxic response. By comparison, it is physically
    impossible to eat enough marijuana to induce death. Marijuana, in its natural
    form, is one of the safest therapeutically active substances known.By any measure
    of rational analysis marijuana can be safely used within the supervised routine of medical care."


    Between 1978 and 1997, 35 states and the District of Columbia passed legislation recognizing
    marijuana's medicinal value. These states are AL, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, FL,
    GA, IL, IA, LA, MA, ME, MI, MN, MO, MT, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NY, NC, OH, OK, OR,
    RI, SC, TN, TX, VT, VA, WA, WV, and WI


    There are more than 60 therapeutic compunds in cannabis that are healing agents in medical and herbal treatments. The primary one is THC, and the effectiveness of therapy is directly proportionate to the herb's potency or concentration of THC. Recent DEA reports of increasingly potent marijuana therefore represent a major medical advance; but incredibly, the government uses these very numbers to solicit bigger budgets and harsher penalties.
    The following explains how people will benefit when the freedom of choice of doctors and patients is once again respected.
    1. ASTHMA
    More than 15 million Americans are affected by asthma. Smoking cannabis (The "raw drug" as the AMA called it) would be beneficial for 80% of them and add 30-60 million person-years in the aggregate of extended life to current asthmatics over presently legal toxic medicines such as the Theophylline prescribed to children.
    "Taking a hit of marijuana has been known to stop a full blown asthma attack." (Personal communication with Dr. Donald Tashkin, December 12, 1989 and December 1, 1997.) The use of cannabis for asthmatics goes back thousands of years in literature. American doctors of the last century wrote glowing reports in medical papers that asthma sufferers of the world would "bless" Indian hemp (cannabis) all their lives.
    Today, of the 16 million American asthma sufferers, only those living in California, Arizona and Nevada, with a doctor's recommendation can legally grow and use cannabis medicines, even though it is generally the most effective treatment for asthma.
    (Tashkin, Dr Donald, UCLA Pulmonary Studies (for smoked marijuana), 1969-97; Ibid., asthma studies, 1969-1976; Cohen, Sidney, & Stillman, Therapeutic Potential of Marijuana, 1976; Life Insurance Actuarial rates; Life shortening effects of childhood asthma, 1983.)
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    2. GLAUCOMA
    Foureen percent of all blindness in America is from glaucoma, a progressive loss of vision. Cannabis smoking would benefit 90% of our 2.5 million glaucoma victims, and is two to three times as effective as any current medicines for reducing ocular pressure!
    Cannabis use has no toxic side effects to the liver and kidneys; nor is there any danger of the occasional sudden death syndromes associated with the legal pharmaceutical glaucoma drugs/drops.
    Many California eye doctors, through the 1970's 80's and 90's discreetly advised their patients to use "street" marijuana in addition to (or to mitigate) their toxic legal glaucoma medicines.
    Since November 1996, California, Arizona and Nevada doctors can legally recommend, advise or tacitly approve cannabis use by their glaucoma patients who may then grow and smoke their own marijuana, or go to the Cannabis Buyers' Clubs to acquire medical marijuana.
    3. TUMORS
    A tumor is a mass of swollen tissue. Researchers at the Medical College of Virginia discovered that cannabis is an incredibly successful herb for reducing many types of tumors, both benign and malignant (cancerous).
    The DEA and other federal agencies had ordered these tumor studies done after hearing erroneous reports of possible immunicological problems associated with cannabis smoke. But, in 1975, instead of health problems, an apparent medical breakthrough occurred and successful tumor reductions were recorded!
    Following this remarkably positive discovery by the Medical College of Virginia, orders were immediately handed down by the DEA and the National Institute of Health to defund all further cannabis/tumor research and reporting! Millions of Americans who might be alive today are dead because of these and other DEA orders regarding marijuana. Since 1996, the Medical College of Virginia has again applied to receive grants for cannabis research and has been turned down by the DEA.
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    4. NAUSEA RELIEF (eg, AIDS, CANCER THERAPY, SEA SICKNESS)
    Though it is known to be extremely damaging to the immune system, chemotherapy is claimed by practitioners to benefit cancer and AIDS patients. But chemo has serious side effects too, including nausea. "marijuana is the best agent for control of nausea in cancer chemotherapy," according to Dr. Thomas Ungerleider, who headed California's Marijuana for Cancer research program from 1979 to 1984. This is also true in AIDS and even in the unsettled stomach common in motion sickness.
    Pharmaceutical nausea-control drugs come in pills that are often swallowed by the patient only to be thrown back up. Because cannabis can be ingested as smoke, it stays in the system and keeps working even if vomiting continues.
    Throughout the state's 10-year Compassionate Marijuana Medical law, George Deukmejian, both as attorney general and as governor, with no regard for the suffering of dying cancer patients, made it virtually impossible for them to get cannabis. California Governor Pete Wilson was following the same course until the medical marijuana initative passed in November 1996.
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    5. EPILEPSY, MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, BACK PAIN, MUSCLE SPASMS
    Cannabis is beneficial for 60% of all epileptics. It is definitely the best treatment for many, but not all types of epilepsy, and for victims' post-seizure mental traumas. Cannabis extract is more effective than Dilantin (a commonly prescribed anti-epileptic with severe side effects). Medical World News reported in 1971: "Marijuana...is probably the most potent anti-epileptic known to medicine today." (Mikuriya, Tod H., M.D. Marijuana Medical Papers 1839-1972, page xxii.)
    Cannabis users' epileptic seizures are of less intensity than the more dangerous seizures experienced by users of pharmaceuticals. Similarly, smoking cannabis has proven to be a major source of relief for multiple sclerosis, which affects the nervous system and is characterized by muscular weakness, tremors, etc.
    Aside from addictive morphine, cannabis, whether smoked or applied as an herbal pack or poultice, is also the best muscle relaxant, back spasm medicine and general antispasmodic medication on our planet.
    5. EPILEPSY, MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, BACK PAIN, MUSCLE SPASMS
    Cannabis is beneficial for 60% of all epileptics. It is definitely the best treatment for many, but not all types of epilepsy, and for victims' post-seizure mental traumas. Cannabis extract is more effective than Dilantin (a commonly prescribed anti-epileptic with severe side effects). Medical World News reported in 1971: "Marijuana...is probably the most potent anti-epileptic known to medicine today." (Mikuriya, Tod H., M.D. Marijuana Medical Papers 1839-1972, page xxii.)
    Cannabis users' epileptic seizures are of less intensity than the more dangerous seizures experienced by users of pharmaceuticals. Similarly, smoking cannabis has proven to be a major source of relief for multiple sclerosis, which affects the nervous system and is characterized by muscular weakness, tremors, etc.
    Aside from addictive morphine, cannabis, whether smoked or applied as an herbal pack or poultice, is also the best muscle relaxant, back spasm medicine and general antispasmodic medication on our planet.
    In September 1993, in Santa Cruz County, California, Sheriffs rearrested epileptic Valerie Corral and confiscated the five marijuana plants she was growing for medicine even though 77% of the citizens of Santa Cruz voted in November 1992 to instruct local law enforcement not to prosecute medical marijuana users. Charges against Corral had been dropped earlier in March 1993 because she was the first person in California to meet all six points of a medical necessity defense.
    In 1997 Valerie, who runs a compassionate use club, was named Citizen of the Year in Santa Cruz.
    (Cohen & Stillman, Therapeutic Potential of Marijuana, 1976; Consult U.S. Pharmacopoeia prior to 1937; Mikuriya, Tod H., M.D., Marijuana Medical Papers, 1839-1972.)
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    6. ANTIBIOTIC CBD DISINFECTANTS
    Young un-budded hemp plants provide extractions of CBDs (cannabidiolic acids). There are many antibiotic uses of the cannabidiols, including treatment for gonorrhea. A 1990 Florida study indicated its use in treating herpes.
    The acid side of tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiols occur inversely to the amount of the plant's THC and is therfore more acceptable to prohibitionists because "it won't get you high." For virtually any disease or infection that can be treated with terramycin, cannabis derivatives did better in Czechoslovakian studies, 1952-1955. The Czechs in 1997 still published farm crop reports on strategies to grow cannabidiol rich hemp.
    (Also see Cohen & Stillman, Therapeutic Potential of Marijuana; Mikuriya, Tod H., M.D., Marijuana Medical Papers; Roffman, Marijuana as Medicine, 1982; International Farm Crop abstracts.)



     
  2. Thanks for the info higha! Very useful, and it was a good read
     
  3. Awesome article! Thanks for the info. I was suprised by some of the names that are favorable to med. MJ.

     
  4. Great data Higha! Thanks for the posting the thread!
     
  5. Very interesting, thanks...:)
     
  6. "Many organizations have favorable positions (e.g., unimpeded research) on medical
    marijuana. These groups include: The Institute of Medicine, The American Cancer
    Society; American Medical Association; Australian Commonwealth Department of
    Human Services and Health; California Medical Association; Federation of
    American Scientists; Florida Medical Association; and the National Academy of
    Sciences. "

    i'd love to see that list expanded on. and also to see the other list. :D the one with all the research agencies that are funded by breweries, tobacco companies, ties to pharmacueticals, petrochemical etc etc etc.

    i was suprised to see AMA there. maybe i'm not quite "getting" what "unimpeded research" and "favorable positions" means, but i've seen mixed reports from AMA. that could be a sign that they are impartial and without extra agendas, or, it could mean they sometimes fall prey to outside influence. hefty scientific grants can be quite appealing to those in scientific admin... and they have to draw in the cash from somewhere.




    am i the only one who's stonedless enough to realise that 5 is there twice!? :D hehe



    great post higha, i'm always on the lookout for articles that manage to crap in alot in a short space. cos the cannabis issue is big, and those who dont appreciate the need for drug law reform tend to switch off quite early before even teh tip of the iceberg is painted in a picture for them. short and to the point ... thats what we need. concise accurate and dare i say "punchy". ... but not too punchy. too many chants like free the weed and quit trying out patients and zero tollerance=zero inteligence dont really do much for the cause. ya only appreciate them once you're converted. so, like i was saying, punchy but not to punchy, waffleless and short 'n' to the point. no waffle. keep people interested by only spouting what matters, and, i just want to know, is anyone still reading this? zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.


    :D teehee.
     
  7. Hello Highawatha,

    I agree with most of what you posted. But if you dont mind, I have some nitpicks also.



    There are over 60 cannabinoids in cannabis, but only a few of them, cannabidiol and delta9, and delta8 THC, have definite therapeutic efficacy. There have also been some claims for therapeutic effects of cannabis terpenoids.



    It simply is not true that 30-60 million person years are lost because of failure to use cannabis over currently available bronchodilators. The only advantage cannabis seems to have over existing medications is a longer duration of action.


    Yep, this is true. Tashkin et al (1975) for instance found that cannabis cigarettes (2% THC) immediately reversed both methacholine and exercise-induced bronchospasm and bronchoconstriction, and Tashkin et al (1977) found that aerosolized THC 5-20mg immediately increased airway conductance, reaching a peak of +33-41% at 1-2 hours, with the bronchodilation effect persisting 3-4 hours. The effect was found to be bronchodilator effect of aerosolized THC was less than that of isoproterenol after 5 minutes, but greater than that of isoproterenol after 1 to 3 hours. Unfortunately, these effects were inconsistent between subjects, and two asthmatic subjects experienced bronchoconstriction following THC aerosol treatment, which is one of the reasons Tashkin concluded that THC is probably not suitable for asthma therapy in most people.


    Nope. Abouti 60-65% of people get IOP reduction from cannabis (Green, 1998).


    No. Cannabis decreases IOP by about 20-25%, which is comparable to other glaucoma medications. However, existing glaucoma medications only require two applications per day via eyedrops, do not require one to be stoned all day every day for the rest of one's life, and havevery few side effects. A big problem with cannabis as glaucoma medication is that a substantial fraction of patients simply do not like the high, and in every study that has been done to date, a large fraction of patiens have dropped out becaus they didn't like the side effects such as dizziness, tachycardia, and excessive sedation. In younger people and experienced older smokers, these are not a problem, but in a 75 year old woman they can be major problems. For these and other reasons, the Institute of Medicine report concluded:


    On the other hand, if IOP control is not achieved using existing medicines, I would have no problem with using cannabis as an adjunct.


    That may have been true in the 70's. It certainly is not true today. Cannabis is effective as an antiemetic only when weakly or moderating emetogenic chemothepies are used.. Cannabis is no better than placebo for controlling emesis secondary to chemotherapies using cisplatin, for instance, yet 5-HT3 antagonists combined with i.v. dexamethasone, provide almost complete control of emesis for about 80% of patients. However, combining cannabis with these drugs may confer an additive benefit. Again, the IOM report concluded:



    I haven't seen any evidence suggesting the ant-spasmodic efficacy of cannabis when used in the form of a poultice, and I would expect essentially zero absorption of cannabinoids, which are lipophilic, through the skin without using a permeation enhancer like DMSO.

    Therion
     
  8. IF I CANT SLEEP CAN THE GOV. GIVE ME WEED?
     
  9. very informative highawatha, that could be used nicely as a pamphlet
     
  10. very cool, thanks :)
     
  11. What about for anxiety relief? It helps my anxiety disorder way better then any medication my doc has given me..
     

  12. interesting...it makes some of us a bit paranoid....wait, did you hear that? I think they're looking at us...do you think they know we're high?
     
  13. I do believe that God (insert your own image here) gave us Cannabis to use for all available uses. It has been used for thousands of years for many ailments. I have used it for the following conditions:
    Asthma
    Glaucoma
    Depression
    Anxiety
    Nausea
    Boredom.

    OK, tha last one is more of a recreation thing, but being sick of reality can be called an illness. That is my story and I am sticking to it.

    Smoking and Joking since 1970.

    OT
     

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