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"Victimless" Crime Constitutes 86% of The Federal Prison Population!


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#1
Limecat

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This link might as well read: "Square circles constitute 86% of all circles." There is no such thing as a square circle. There is no such thing as a victimless crime.

Victimless Crime Constitutes 86% of The Federal Prison Population | Libertarian News

Some shocking prison statistics brought to you by Drug War Facts.org

The 2009 federal prison population consisted of:

Drugs 50.7%, Public-order 35.0%, Violent 7.9%, Property 5.8%, Other .7%


Drug offenses are self-explanatory, but the public-order offenses also fall under the victimless crimes category. Public order offenses include such things as immigration, weapons charges, public drunkenness, selling lemonade without a license, feeding the homeless without a permit etc..

The United States has the highest prison population rate in the world, 756 per 100,000 of the national population. The world population in 2008 is estimated at 6,750 million (United Nations); set against a world prison population of 9.8 million this produces a world prison population rate of 145 per 100,000 (158 per 100,000 if set against a world prison population of 10.65 million).

In 2008, according to the Department of Justice, there were 7,308,200 persons in the US corrections system, of whom 4,270,917 were on probation, 828,169 were on parole, 785,556 were in jails, and 1,518,559 were in state and federal prisons.

In other words, 1 in 42 Americans is under correctional supervision. This constitutes over 2% of the entire US population. That percentage jumps up drastically if we limit the comparison to working aged adult males, of which there are around 100 million. Over 5% of the adult male population is under some form of correctional supervision, alternatively stated, 1 in 20 adult males is under correctional supervision in the US. One in 36 adult Hispanic men is behind bars, based on Justice Department figures for 2006. One in 15 adult black men is, too, as is one in nine black men ages 20 to 34.

Keep in mind that 86% of those men in federal prisons are there for victimless crimes. They have not stolen any property, damaged any property, or harmed anyone directly by their actions. Of course, if you are reading this and live in the US, you are paying for all those people to subsist on a daily basis. Roughly 34% of all prisoners in the US are incarcerated for victimless crimes.

In California in 2009 it cost an average of $47,102 a year to incarcerate an inmate in state prison. In 2005 it cost an average of $23,876 dollars per state prisoner nationally.

Posted Image

In 2007, 228 billion dollars was spent on police, corrections and the judiciary. That constitutes around 1.6% of total US GDP.

Of course, being the good economists that we are, we must not just look at the cost to incarcerate and police, but also at the opportunity cost to society that putting all those able-bodied men behind bars creates. When a man is put behind bars, he is obviously incapable of contributing anything to society. He becomes a complete burden to society while producing nothing in return for the expenses he creates. He becomes a black void of resource destruction.

I find some dark humor in the fact that those who engage in victimless crime don’t create any real victims until they are put behind bars, at which point they cause the State to steal 47,000 dollars a year from the tax paying public. In our justice system today, victims are victimized twice. Once by the perpetrator of the crime against them, and the other by the State which then forces the victim to pay for the punishment of their assailant.

Clearly our society’s notion of “justice” is logically ridiculous. It’s apparently not OK for someone to steal from you, but its perfectly acceptable for the State to steal from you if the State is going to use that money to punish the person who stole from you. – what kind of asinine system of justice is that?

The only real justice that can be enacted in a free society is either physical punishment that costs next to nothing to administer, such as beatings, lashings, bullet to the head, etc..; monetary punishment in the form of taking the perpetrators property and handing it to their victim, or ostracism by defamation of character.

Putting people behind bars does nothing but squander resources. It deprives society of able-bodied workers and costs society massive amounts of resources which are stolen from the general public through the coercive theft of taxation. Consider how much richer American society would be today if it had an additional 5% of the male population working to produce goods and services in the private sector labor force.

Austrian economist Hans Hoppe has put together a fantastic presentation on how society could be organized in such a way as to eliminate all victimless crime while simultaneously eliminating the necessity of the State to steal from the victims of crimes to pay for their assailants punishment.

After you’re done watching Hoppe’s lecture, check out this fantastic comic put together by the Real Cost of Prisons project.

If you are interested in learning more about private law and private defense, listen to this series of essays by Austrian economist Robert Murphy.


[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzglDS88u50]A Private Law Society (by Hans Hoppe) - YouTube[/ame]

A Private Law Society (by Hans Hoppe) - YouTube


A "victimless crime" is an insane concept, just like a "crimeless crime". If your body or other property has not been damaged, then you do not have standing to bring a case.

The dog fighter, the heroin dealer, the insider trader, and any other of the people who the state labels "criminal" despite having committed a crime against no one are sentenced to rape regularly. What sort of a society supports this? I'm against rape as a form of punishment in general, but it seems especially ludicrous, tyrannical, and evil when the state sentences people to rape for doing things like avoiding taxes or selling raw milk.

Rape Factories - Reason Magazine

The U.S. Department of Justice recently released its first-ever estimate of the number of inmates who are sexually abused in America each year. According to the department’s data, which are based on nationwide surveys of prison and jail inmates as well as young people in juvenile detention centers, at least 216,600 inmates were victimized in 2008 alone. Contrary to popular belief, most of the perpetrators were not other prisoners but staff members—corrections officials whose job it is to keep inmates safe. On average, each victim was abused between three and five times over the course of the year. The vast majority were too fearful of reprisals to seek help or file a formal complaint.


Related:

http://forum.grassci...lize-drugs.html

http://forum.grassci...n-movement.html

http://forum.grassci...ijuana-ads.html

http://forum.grassci...spensaries.html

http://forum.grassci...est-quotas.html

http://forum.grassci...l-cannabis.html

http://forum.grassci...rohibition.html

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikLIRqv0wZY]The Cost of the War on Drugs - YouTube[/ame]

The Cost of the War on Drugs - YouTube


Foundation for Economic Education | Home to freedom and prosperity, and free-market education for over 50 years

Edited by MJU1983, 21 November 2011 - 01:33 AM.

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#2
maxrule

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Nice post man. Great topic. This insanity has got to end.

Corrupt congress has every incentive to write more public order laws and tougher drug war legislation since they are likely invested in the private prison industry on wall street.

I have a play list on youtube and I'm looking for more great clips to add. Post them here if you have any or message me.

Slaves in Private Prisons


#3
Suck My Mind

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The crack in the US government is that it seems like it was built on making more never ending laws. There should be a limit of how many laws can be put in place in a yearly or decade specification.

#4
Arteezy

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Awesome post. I'd rep you if it would let me.

#5
s7exiled

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xmaspoo

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#7
TheAtmansPath

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86% of the fed prison population is innocent? What is this, Guantanamo bay?

I feel so sorry for their families, every night going to sleep without a father, a brother, a sister a mother, and for their partners, with an empty space left where his or her body should lie next to them.

That's what it's all about guys, what it comes down too. This is why we preach freedom despite it's unpopularity, because eventually we will all be criminals. The people will be free one day.

#8
Swills

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No such thing as a victimless crime? I disagree.


So growing my pot and smoking is isn't a victimless crime?

Edited by Swills, 20 November 2011 - 04:46 PM.


#9
Simmerten

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Is it suprising that I am not suprised about this suprising statistic?

#10
TheAtmansPath

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No such thing as a victimless crime? I disagree.


So growing my pot and smoking is isn't a victimless crime?


He means a victimless crime isn't a crime at all

#11
tharedhead

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#12
Spikoli

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If it wasn't for paraphernalia and possession charges court dockets would be so quiet....


news reporter: president paul has refused to sign the 2013 budget for the DEA. when asked what they will be pursuing now that funding has been cut for the war on drugs a doj spokesperson responded with this

(fade to clip) [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8E_zMLCRNg]Cricket Sound - YouTube[/ame]

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xmaspoo

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#14
Spikoli

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^ Hey now, I think the DEA would actually do a pretty good job as a road cleanup crew.


yeah, but think of how many dogs that would get shot per mile cleaned
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#15
qwerty man

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Well, I mean someone has to make exorbitantly high profits off leftover food stuffs.

A grocery store wouldn't buy potatoes from a level 3 purveyor for even $0.50/lb, but the Federal Bureau of Prisons is willing to pay 3 times that for the same potatoes!

Prison is a business and its inventory is American lives.

#16
Limecat

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[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikLIRqv0wZY]The Cost of the War on Drugs - YouTube[/ame]

The Cost of the War on Drugs - YouTube


Foundation for Economic Education | Home to freedom and prosperity, and free-market education for over 50 years

#17
Felt

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#18
Limecat

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‎911 is useless. There should be a 211, 611, 711, and 811 who compete with 911 to secure the liberty of their customers. The state-backed police are a bunch of federal welfare junkies who prosecute innocent people and ignore guilty people.

Driven By Drug War Incentives, Cops Target Pot Smokers, Brush Off Victims Of Violent Crime

Federal anti-drug grants, asset forfeiture policies and a generation of battlefield rhetoric from politicians have made pursuing low-level drug dealers and drug users a top priority for police departments across the country. There's only so much time in the day, and the focus on drugs often comes at the expense of investigating violent crimes with victims like Jessica Shaver. In the span of about a year, she experienced both problems firsthand.



#19
dudeimoncoke

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‎911 is useless. There should be a 211, 611, 711, and 811 who compete with 911 to secure the liberty of their customers. The state-backed police are a bunch of federal welfare junkies who prosecute innocent people and ignore guilty people.

Driven By Drug War Incentives, Cops Target Pot Smokers, Brush Off Victims Of Violent Crime



Man it would be awesome if I could call a number and say, "I need help. The cops are here".
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#20
Limecat

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Man it would be awesome if I could call a number and say, "I need help. The cops are here".


:devious:




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