Jump to content

Welcome to Grasscity Forums - Register now for FREE
Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute.
Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. This message will be removed once you have signed in.
Create an Account

Container Size


  • Please log in to reply
 

#1
s1lverbullet

s1lverbullet

    Registered User

  • Registered Upgraded
  • PipPipPip
  • 63 posts
Starting my first grow and I am a little worried about them out growing the containers I have for them. I have very limited space and am going to put them into flowering about 2 weeks into veg because they are a mango strain and I have read that they will explode in size more than other strains when they go to flower. I have 2 three gallon pots for two of them and 2 two gallon pots for the other two. I am pretty sure that the two gallon pots will not be sufficient but will the three hold up fine? I only have 33 inches of vertical space so I am going to LST them.

Similar Topics: Container Size     x


#2
spacejerk234

spacejerk234

    Space Cadet Extraordinair

  • Bronze Member
  • 719 posts

Edited by spacejerk234, 09 August 2011 - 02:57 AM.


#3
mjmama25

mjmama25

    NorCal Bladie

  • Registered Upgraded
  • 13,186 posts
Are they seed or clone? Seed take up more root space than clones. Either way, I think you'll be ok with 2-3 gallons indoors. I personally like smart pots and camo pots because they make you get a denser rootball and you can use a smaller pot and not get rootbound.

#4
s1lverbullet

s1lverbullet

    Registered User

  • Registered Upgraded
  • PipPipPip
  • 63 posts
They are from seed and right now I have two 2 1/2 gallon pots, one 3 gallon pot, and one 1 1/2 gallon pot. Hoping to get 3 females out of 4 seeds and if I do and one female is in the smaller pot I will transplant her into one of the bigger ones. How do you transplant without breaking the stem?

#5
spacejerk234

spacejerk234

    Space Cadet Extraordinair

  • Bronze Member
  • 719 posts


#6
mjmama25

mjmama25

    NorCal Bladie

  • Registered Upgraded
  • 13,186 posts
Put one hand over the soil around the base of the plant and flip it upside down, catching the rootball as it slides out. You may have to give the container a little shake or poke the bottom of the rootball through the drainage wholes to push it out. Just don't grab the plants and try to pick it up by the stem. You'll rip the roots. If the plants are big, it helps to have two people. One can catch the rootball while one tips the container.

#7
s1lverbullet

s1lverbullet

    Registered User

  • Registered Upgraded
  • PipPipPip
  • 63 posts

Put one hand over the soil around the base of the plant and flip it upside down, catching the rootball as it slides out. You may have to give the container a little shake or poke the bottom of the rootball through the drainage wholes to push it out. Just don't grab the plants and try to pick it up by the stem. You'll rip the roots. If the plants are big, it helps to have two people. One can catch the rootball while one tips the container.


Does the whole thing just plop out in one big piece of soil or is it going to just crumble when I flip it over and end up in a mess on the floor? Anyway to prevent that?

#8
mjmama25

mjmama25

    NorCal Bladie

  • Registered Upgraded
  • 13,186 posts
It depends on how well developed your root system is. If you're talking about transplanting a young plant it will probably fall apart. I really don't even think you need to transplant. 2-3 gallons is plenty for small indoor plants. Even if they grow rapidly in flower, they still won't have long to develop roots. Once you flip to flower, they mostly focus on flowering, not root growth.


1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users