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Spider Mites close to harvest


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#1
Marduk55

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I was battling a spider mite problem during my veg period. I was spraying them down with SNS 217 and doktor doom foggers. I had thought that the problem was solved, but found some mites on the lower branches just where the stems meet my ScrOG. Some of the leaves down there are relatively infested, but I haven't found any webs or anything to that effect.

I would say that about 5% of the crop is infested along their bases. I've never let the problem exist this late into flower, obviously my fault. So I am seeing if GC thinks I am ok with just waiting it out. I plan on cutting on Friday. I'm not running CO2, and since there isn't any indication of webs I am thinking most of them aren't mature. I am currently dropping my room temp between 65-70 to slow their growth. It's a larger grow op so it wouldn't be realistic to individually locate/remove any leaves.

Thanks everyone for any input everyone :o

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#2
Your Grandfathe

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I'd use a 1/1 solution of water to ISO Alcohol, kill dem pretty much outright and won't mess with the buddage.

Get 'em while they are low and it's easy.

#3
Marduk55

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I'd use a 1/1 solution of water to ISO Alcohol, kill dem pretty much outright and won't mess with the buddage.

Get 'em while they are low and it's easy.


I recall reading about ISO and water. That doesn't have any ill effects to the trichs? Since I use it to make Qwiso, it's a weird concept of using it to protect the plants. But then again, the plants won't be soaking in it lol. I'll probably be going this route tonight.

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Lots and Lots of Lady Bugs!

#5
sdgreenthumb

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Here is a short article I wrote last year. I hope this helps.

OK, spider mites are very common in my area. I have several friends that grow and we have all encountered them over the years. If you have a few plants any of the organic methods mentioned in this thread might work. You need to re-apply organics often, make sure you saturate all plant surfaces and stay on top of things for a few treatments after all signs of infestation are gone.

Neem oil as a preventative measure not only prevents mites and insects but a whole host of disease and funguses. I use neem oil on my teenagers before flowering and rarely have a problem with anything. You have mix neem oil carefully, don’t use it on young plants and always apply right before lights out as it may cause leaf burn.

I have tried:
Pyrethrum (Doktor Doom)... it did not work after three applications (it did slow them down)
Sucralose (which is basically Splenda)....it did not work at all after three applications
Neem Oil....it did not work after three applications (it did slow them down)
Safer.....it did not work at all, five applications
Azatrol/Azamax….it did not work after three applications (it did slow them down)

All the above mentioned mite controls are organic and need several through re-applications. Again, if you only have a few plants or are in flowering I would try Azatrol with a surfactant (dish soap) with an application or two of neem oil in between for several weeks. All of the above applications stressed my flowers but that was better than having no flowers at all.

For those of you growing more than a few plants organics may not be the best option since it will require a lot of time to thoroughly apply and re-application is essential. People that grow numerous plants often only use organics during the flowering cycle or as a preventative measure to keep infestations under control while maintaining product safety. Chemical/non-organic pesticides should never be used on flowers, even if the manufacture says it’s safe to eat after a certain amount of time since the application of heat through smoking/vape may cause a change in the chemical structure or mobility of the active ingredient resulting in harmful side effects.


Now on to the harsh stuff. Again DO NOT USE CHEMICALS DURING FLOWERING. Some of these chemicals are translaminar. “Translaminar” is a term that refers to insecticides or miticides that can penetrate the leaf tissue and form a reservoir of active ingredients within the leaf. This does not happen in new growth after treatment so it won’t affect your flowers if you use these products before flowering. However, it will be locked into your flowers forever if they come in contact and therefore should never be used during flowering.

I am partial to Avid. After one application I never had a problem again until I brought an already infected plant into my space. However, mites are highly adaptable and will develop a tolerance to continued re-application of a single product and you should alternate between two or more miticides with different modes of action. At the very least you should never use any chemical miticide as a preventative measure. The last thing you need to do is make a resistant super-mite. The following are some quotes are from an article I found on Greenhouse Product News, explaining all of the various chemical miticides. I did find all of these products available for sale on the internet. This is some really toxic shit, use a respirator, safety equipment and follow the manufacturer’s instructions exactly.

Avid

Avid, manufactured by Syngenta Professional Products, is an insecticide/matricide containing the active ingredient abamectin. The active ingredient, which occurs naturally, is derived from the soil micro-organism, Streptomyces avermitilis. Avid is labeled for control of two spotted spider mite, European red mite, carmine spider mite, Southern red mite, spruce spider mite, cyclamen mite, broad mite, and rust and bud mite.

Avid is translaminar and mites, such as the two spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), the mite most commonly encountered both indoors and outdoors, particularly from spring through late fall, feed on the leaves and may ingest enough active ingredient to kill themselves, even after spray residues have dried.

Avid may provide up to 28 days of residual activity. The label rate for all mite species is 4 fl.oz. per 100 gals. Avid is active on the mobile life stages of mites; however, the matricide has no activity on eggs. Although Avid is slow acting, any treated mites are immobilized after exposure. It has a mode of action that affects the gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) dependent chloride ion channels by increasing membrane permeability to chloride ions, thus leading to inhibition of nerve transmission, paralysis and death.



Akari

Akari has the active ingredient fenpyroximate, manufactured by SePRO Corp. This matricide has a very general label stating control of spider mites. It is also labeled for control of broad mite, cyclamen mite and eriophyid mites (several species). Akari is a contact and stomach poison, so complete coverage of all plant parts is important during application. Akari does not have translaminar activity. It is active on all mite life stages including eggs. However, it has higher efficacy against the larvae than the other life stages. Akari works quickly, providing rapid knockdown of existing mite populations. In fact, treated mites immediately stop feeding and females fail to lay eggs. This matricide provides up to 21 days of residual activity.

The label rate is 16-24 fl.oz. per 100 gals. Akari has a similar mode of action as pyridaben (Sanmite) and acequinocyl (Shuttle). All three miticides are mitochondria electron transport inhibitors (METIs). However, the site of action is different from that of Shuttle. Still, these miticides should not be used in succession in a rotation program. Akari has a mode of action that involves inhibition of the mitochondria electron transport system at the NADH-coenzyme Q reductase site of Complex I.



Floramite

This matricide, manufactured by Chemtura Corp., contains the active ingredient bifenazate. It is labeled for control of two spotted spider mite, Pacific mite, strawberry mite, European red mite, citrus red mite, clover mite, Southern red mite, spruce spider mite, bamboo mite and Lewis mite. Floramite is not active on broad, rust or flat mite. It has contact activity only, so thorough coverage of all plant parts is essential. It is active on all mite life stages, including eggs.

Floramite works quickly and may provide up to 28 days of residual activity. The label rate is 4-8 fl.oz. per 100 gals. Floramite has a mode of action involving the blockage or closure of GABA-activated chloride channels in the peripheral nervous system.



Hexygon

Hexygon, manufactured by Gowan Co., contains the active ingredient hexythiazox and is labeled for control of two spotted spider mite, arborvitae spider mite, European red mite, honey locust spider mite, Pacific spider mite, Southern red mite, spruce spider mite, strawberry mite and Willamette mite. Hexygon is a contact and stomach poison matricide, so thorough coverage of all plant parts is essential. The matricide may provide up to 45 days of residual activity. The label rate is 1-2 oz. per 100 gals. Hexygon is active on mite eggs and the larvae stage. In fact, any eggs deposited by adult females that contact treated surfaces are not viable; however, Hexygon has no direct activity on adult mites. Hexygon has the same mode of action as clofentezine (Ovation), so it is important to avoid using these two miticides in succession in a rotation program. The mode of action of Hexygon involves disrupting the formation of the embryo during development or inhibiting larval maturation. However, the specific mode of action and target site of activity are still not well understood.



Judo

This insectide/miticide, manufactured by OHP Inc., contains the active ingredient spiromesifen. It is formulated as a 480 soluble concentrate (SC) containing 4 lbs. of active ingredient per gallon. Judo is labeled for control of two spotted spider mite, Southern red mite, Lewis mite, tumid mite, maple spider mite, spruce spider mite, honeylocust spider mite, euonymus mite, boxwood spider mite, broad mite, cyclamen mite, false spider mite and eriophyid mites (several species).

This matricide is similar to pyridaben (Sanmite) in terms of target pests, with activity on both spider mites and whiteflies. Judo is active on all life stages — even the eggs — of both spider mites and whiteflies. However, Judo is less effective against the adult stage. The label rate is 2-4 fl.oz. per 100 gals. The matricide has translaminar activity providing up to 30 days of residual activity, which is similar to other miticides including hexythiazox (Hexygon), bifenazate (Floramite) and abamectin (Avid).

Judo has a very unique mode of action compared to the other insecticide/miticides currently available. The active ingredient works as a lipid biosynthesis inhibitor. Lipids are a group of compounds made up of carbon and hydrogen, which includes fatty acids, oils and waxes. Lipid molecules are responsible for a number of functions such as cell structure in membranes and sources of energy. As such, Judo blocks the production of lipids, which disrupts cell membrane structural integrity and reduces energy sources.



Ovation

Ovation, manufactured by Scotts Co., contains the active ingredient clofentezine and is labeled for control of two spotted spider mite, Pacific spider mite, McDaniel spider mite, European red mite and yellow spider mite. Because Ovation is a contact matricide only, thorough coverage of all plant parts is critical during application. This matricide is active on mite eggs and the immature stages, such as the nymphs and larvae, with no direct activity on adult mites.

Although Ovation is slow acting, it can provide up to 45 days of residual activity. The label rate is 2 fl.oz. per 100 gals. Ovation has the same mode of action as hexythiazox (Hexygon), which means these two miticides should not be used in succession in a rotation program. Ovation has a mode of action that disrupts the formation of the embryo during development or inhibiting larval maturation. However, the specific mode of action and target site of activity are still not well understood.



Pylon

Pylon is an insecticide/matricide containing the active ingredient chlorfenapyr. Pylon, manufactured by OHP Inc., is labeled for control of two spotted spider mite, broad mite, cyclamen mite, citrus bud mite and rust mite. This insecticide/matricide has both contact and translaminar activity. Additionally, Pylon works as a stomach poison when ingested. The insecticide/matricide is active on the mobile life stages, including larvae, nymphs and adults. It has no activity on mite eggs.

Pylon may provide up to 28 days of control. The label rate is 2.6-5.2 fl.oz. per 100 gals. The mode of action of Pylon involves uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation, which is a major energy-producing step in cells, by disrupting the H+ gradient, and thus preventing the formation of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), a high-energy organic phosphate responsible for energy transfer during cellular reactions.



Sanmite

The active ingredient in Sanmite, manufactured by Scotts Co., is pyridaben. Sanmite is labeled for control of two spotted spider mite, broad mite, European red mite, Southern red mite and tumid mite. Sanmite is a contact insecticide/matricide only, so thorough coverage of all plant parts is important for effective control. It has activity on all mite life stages, including eggs, nymphs, larvae and adults. Sanmite works quickly on the mobile stages and may provide up to 45 days of residual activity.

The label rate is 4 oz. per 100 gals. Sanmite has a similar mode of action as fenpyroximate (Akari) and acequinocyl (Shuttle). All three are METIs; however, the site of action is different from Shuttle. Still, these miticides should not be used in succession in a rotation program. Sanmite has a mode of action that involves inhibition of the mitochondria electron transport system at the NADH-coenzyme Q reductase site of Complex I.



Shuttle

Shuttle has the active ingredient acequinocyl. Manufactured by Arysta LifeScience, this matricide is formulated as a 15-percent soluble concentrate (SC). Shuttle is labeled for control of two spotted spider mite and spruce spider mite. The matricide works by contact activity only but is active on all spider mite life stages, including eggs. It kills spider mites quickly and provides up to 28-days of residual activity. The label rate is 6.4 to 12.8 fl.oz. per 100 gals. Shuttle has a mode of action similar to fenpyroximate (Akari) and pyridaben (Sanmite) as all three miticides are METIs. However, whereas both Akari and Sanmite work in blocking electron transfer at Complex I in the mitochondria, Shuttle binds to the Qo center of Complex III in the mitochondria, reducing energy production by preventing synthesis of ATP. Regardless, it is still important to avoid using any one of these three miticides in succession in a rotation program.



TetraSan

TetraSan, manufactured by Valent U.S.A. Corp., contains the active ingredient etoxazole, and is actually a growth regulator for mites, inhibiting the molting process. TetraSan is labeled for control of two spotted spider mite, citrus red mite, European red mite, Lewis spider mite, Pacific spider mite, Southern red mite and spruce spider mite. This matricide has both contact and translaminar activity providing up to 28 days of control from a single application. The label rate is 8-16 oz. per 100 gals. TetraSan is active on the egg, larvae, and nymphal stages of mites. It generally has minimal activity on adult mites. However, adult female mites that are treated do not produce viable eggs. The mode of action of TetraSan is as a chitin synthesis inhibitor by preventing the formation of chitin, which is an essential component of an insect and mite’s exoskeleton causing the cuticle to become thin and brittle. As a result, mites die while attempting to molt from one life stage to the next.



ProMite

ProMite (formally Vendex) is one of the older miticides and contains the active ingredient fenbutatin-oxide. Manufactured by Griffin LLC, this matricide is available in water-soluble packets and is labeled for control of two spotted spider mite, clover mite, oak mite, Southern red mite and spruce spider mite. ProMite is a contact matricide only, so it is important to thoroughly spray all plant parts during application. This matricide is slower acting than most miticides, taking 7-10 days to eventually kill mites. However, it provides up to 30 days of residual activity. The label rate is 8-16 oz. per 100 gals. ProMite is a warm-weather matricide providing better control when the ambient air temperature is above 70° F. ProMite has a mode of action involving the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation at the site of dinitrophenol uncoupling, which disrupts the formation or synthesis of ATP. This is a restricted use matricide (48-hour restricted entry interval).

In conclusion, it is best to stay organic as much as possible. If you only have a few plants it will be well worth your time to treat organicly for the piece of mind achieved. Never use chemicals on flowers. If you are forced to use chemicals, be safe.

#6
brightgreen

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I used hot shot no pest strips to kill my spider mite problem that also sprung up in late flower.

I would recommend not spraying anything on to your buds, as I tried this with azamax and it ruined my buds even though used correctly.

#7
Hydro Druid

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I was battling a spider mite problem during my veg period. I was spraying them down with SNS 217 and doktor doom foggers. I had thought that the problem was solved, but found some mites on the lower branches just where the stems meet my ScrOG. Some of the leaves down there are relatively infested, but I haven't found any webs or anything to that effect.

I would say that about 5% of the crop is infested along their bases. I've never let the problem exist this late into flower, obviously my fault. So I am seeing if GC thinks I am ok with just waiting it out. I plan on cutting on Friday. I'm not running CO2, and since there isn't any indication of webs I am thinking most of them aren't mature. I am currently dropping my room temp between 65-70 to slow their growth. It's a larger grow op so it wouldn't be realistic to individually locate/remove any leaves.

Thanks everyone for any input everyone :o


How far into Flower are you?

Lady bugs might work like the previous user suggested. Release thousands of them during the dark period and hope for the best.

The foggers never really seem to do the trick. They are better suited for preventive measures and light infestations. I like a combo attack using Azatrol, Sucrashield, wetting agent to ease surface tension and Pyronyl.

I love Pyronyl because it's 5-6% PYRETHRUM verse 1% like those foggers. Allows for a more aggressive mixture when needed.

#8
halfa380

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they are not necesarly spider mites. could be thrips.i use neem oil. but would suggest during late flowering. it all depends how far are you. if after 4 weeks then lady bugs is your best chance.

#9
Ctownbudz

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The best product is Pylon TR. It is a dry aerosol application and safe on flowers and blooms. Try this in veg and bloom to kill mites.

#10
Sam Handwich

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Pylon TR has only been approved for ornamental crops and not for consumable crops (ie weed).


Depending on the chemical, pesticides deemed for ornamentals that are used on consumable crops (if used by consumer) create a variety of health issues. Cancer (pancreatic, bladder, colon, lung, esophagus, stomach, etc.), Multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, birth defects, allergies, and mental retardation to name just a few.

Many pesticides have a half-life that can last much longer than the lifespan of a cannabis plant. So, no, even if you apply harmful pesticides during the veg cycle, you are creating a toxic plant. Many pesticides are systemic, meaning they stay & spread within the plant for quite some time.


I ADVISE EVERYBODY TO COMPLETELY DISREGARD EVERY PRODUCT SUGGESTED BY THE USER sdgreenthumb.

sorry man, im not trying to take shots at you, but there is no way I will stay silent & bear my conscious with the thought that uneducated marijuana growers are posioning the population with these harmful pesticides.

you yourself even stated:

This is some really toxic shit, use a respirator, safety equipment and follow the manufacturer’s instructions exactly.

any pesticide that requires a respirator due to its toxicity has been banned by the USDA for consumable food crops (ie. every single pesticide you posted on your list.)


lets take a look at one of the wonderful miracle cures you shared with us, Oviation, mfd. by the worldwide peacekeeper Scotts (or better known as Monsanto).......

Clofentezine - toxicity, ecological toxicity and regulatory information

^thats a possible carcinogen. do you want to feed that to your weed plants?^


how about the other great product you posted right below it, Pylon. Pylon, chemical name chlorfenapyr, was denied by the EPA in 2000. The EPA - the corrupt bastard fuckheads they are - mainly weigh economic value vs environmental impact before they approve or disapprove a product. even they initially disapproved it! what did they reccomend? Spinosad (aka Monteray garden spray or captain jack's dead bug brew), an organic bacteria that kills mosquitos, gnats, blackflies, and a handful of other pests.


EPA: Pesticides - EPA Determines That Chlorfenapyr Does Not Meet the Requirements for Registration; American Cyanamid Withdraws Application

.....than the product the the EPA said no to, chlorfenapyr, was approved by EPA head Christine Todd Whitman.....the same lady that, after 9/11, stated the giant cloud of dust from the collapse of the twin towers was "safe and okay to breathe".......




........






i use a product called neem cake. i literally sprinkle it in on the topsoil every time i transplant. i sprinkle quite a bit on the topsoil of each plant. i have been pest free for the past year since i have started using it.


even the outdoor plants i had this summer in the middle of a swamp stayed bug free! to go the extra step, take water and a handful of neem seed meal, put them in an old gallon milk jug or OJ jug or whatever, bake it in the sun for a day while shaking 1-2 times every hour (keep the lid loose inbetween shakings!).......you will have a very, very potent pesticide/fungicide/deer repellent/beneficial foliar feed. during the rainy fall season, the neem even prevented budrot from destroying my crops.

Neem, Neem Oil, Karanja Oil, Neem & Karanja products



my method of action for any problem that threatens my plants is neem. i would suggest it to anyone else over anything, but everybody has their own methods. pyrethrum, bacillus thurengensis, met-52.....they're all good products. use of any of those pesticides are recommended by me.




again, i strongly discourage anybody from using ANY of the pesticides suggested by sdgreenthumb

its scary to think marijuana growers use these pesticides. think about it, you buy dope from someone & you dont know who grew it or how it was grown.....what pesticides were used? how much of these harmful chemicals were used?..........see what i mean? we can be poisoning ourselves and not even know it, all because our government wants to make a plant "illegal".........................




edit: i appreciate you sharing information sdgreenthumb, please do not to take this post as offensive toward you, i am just extremely adamant regarding the use of pesticides.

Edited by OSUB, 13 October 2012 - 09:27 PM.

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#11
Ctownbudz

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Actually Pylon TR is labeled for vegetables which sounds consumable to me. Read the label dude before you make any ignorant rants. The active is made from a bacteria. Sounds similar to pyrethrum which is made in a plant. Keep using your neem oil though even when there are new innovative products that actually work.
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#12
Sam Handwich

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Pylon, chemical name chlorfenapyr, was denied by the EPA in 2000. The EPA - the corrupt bastard fuckheads they are - mainly weigh economic value vs environmental impact before they approve or disapprove a product. even they initially disapproved it! what did they reccomend? Spinosad (aka Monteray garden spray or captain jack's dead bug brew), an organic bacteria that kills mosquitos, gnats, blackflies, and a handful of other pests.


EPA: Pesticides - EPA Determines That Chlorfenapyr Does Not Meet the Requirements for Registration; American Cyanamid Withdraws Application

.....than the product the the EPA said no to, chlorfenapyr, was approved by EPA head Christine Todd Whitman.....the same lady that, after 9/11, stated the giant cloud of dust from the collapse of the twin towers was "safe and okay to breathe"

did you even bother to read what i said? or are you just stuck in your own ways? this is what scares me.......to all the outside readers, would you want to smoke this guys crap, the weed he sprayed chemicals all over? no.

12 years ago, pylon tr was disapproved by the EPA under the clinton administration, than one year later it was approved because the EPA received a new Commander in Chief (W. Bush administration, read quote above). as you can see, i took this "safe for use on fruits and vegetables" approach with a grain of salt.


so, yes, i will go back to my neem. its worked miracles for me. it is also cheaper than anything on that list of garbage. it has much more benefits than just a "pesticide."


show me a .pdf or something to the process of how they actually make chlorfenapyr. you may change my mind about it for the better or worse. in the mean time, keep smoking toxic chemicals you dont know about. the mental retardation will catch up with you someday!

Edited by OSUB, 14 October 2012 - 01:48 PM.


#13
Ctownbudz

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Why are you making this political? The label is the law and the label says for use on fruiting vegetables. I love eating vegetables. Btw Pylon TR was only registered in the last year. It is not the liquid. You are misinformed and sound ignorant. If you want to produce enough smoke to feed the world you have to use new innovative techniques.

#14
Your Grandfathe

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Just want to interject a factoid:

7 of the most toxic compounds known to man are used in either pesticides or herbicides.

IMHO, it's not the action of these compounds but rather the residual residue that is the real lingering problem. I would challenge BASF (in this case) to come forward with an effective product that is zero residue.

#15
Storm Crow

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For those who want a safer alternative-

How to Use Dr. Bronners As Insecticidal Soap | eHow.com

Spray on day 1, rinse on day 2, rest on day 3, and repeat until the pest is gone. Insects can't become resistant to insecticidal soaps because it smothers them! Any soap you rinse off is broken down by soil bacteria into ferts!

Sometimes the "old-fashioned" stuff is just plain better!

Granny

#16
Sam Handwich

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since this thread is still alive after my last comment, i wanted to apologize for getting carried away. i just care about people's health.

sorry ctown. i didnt even read your post after my last one, and im not going to because im anticipating that its bad, i dont wanna argue...so im gonna opt out of this discussion. sorry again! :bolt:

#17
Ctownbudz

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I like old fashioned in rotation too. Pyrethrum works well some resistance though. Oils never fail either but be careful about surfactants. Also I have heard from friends that allegedly used it that some residue was left on plants.

#18
pointswest

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When you want to find out about chemical pesticides enter the name of the chemical and MSDS. MSDS is the material safety data sheet of the requested chemical and lists all hazards associated with the selected chemical.

This Pylon does not look like something good to smoke.

http://www.cdms.net/LDat/mpU5B001.pdf


Hotshot strips are also mentioned above. These are not for use in areas where humans live. Overexposure to the vapors of these strips short circuit the synapse of brain cells. Growers are unknowingly poisoning themselves and the users of their crops using these products.

If you knew what was really on your purchased weed, you would give up smoking. This is the primary reason to organically grow your own. Cash crop growers don't care about your health.

Spinosad works on flowering plants for mite control up to the day of harvest and is harmless to humans.



http://www.cdms.net/LDat/mpU5B001.pdf

PW

Edited by pointswest, 14 October 2012 - 05:17 PM.


#19
Ctownbudz

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Spinosad the active ingredient in conserve from DOW sounds harmful on the msds too. I do not know what to follow? The labels which make them sound fine for vegetables or the msds which makes them sound harmful.


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