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Using Hydrogen Peroxide to Treat and Prevent Root Rot


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#1
Caribbean

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Using Hydrogen Peroxide to Treat and Prevent Root Rot

Posted Image

What are the benefits of Hydrogen Peroxide and how do i apply it?


Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) it is made up of Hydrogen (H2) and Oxygen (O2), however H2O2 has an extra Oxygen atom in an unstable arrangement - it is this extra negatively charged Oxygen atom that gives H2O2 its useful properties. H2O2 is used for many purposes including cleaning, bleaching, sterilizing, rocket fuel, animal feed treatment and in addition many miraculous claims about its health benefits have been made. This faq focuses on its use in horticultural applications. H2O2 is of great use for both hydroponics and dirt/soilless gardening.

What Does Hydrogen Peroxide do?

H2O2 is an unstable molecule; when it breaks down, a single oxygen atom (O-)and a molecule of water is released. This oxygen atom is extremely reactive and will attach itself to either another Oxygen atom (forming a stable O2 molecule) or attack a nearby organic molecule.

H2O2 will rapidly eliminate the Chlorine used in many municipal water supplies, as well as degrade any pesticides, herbicides or other organic matter that might be present. Well water is often high in methane and organic sulfates, both of which H2O2 will remove.

Both the stable and O- forms will increase the level of dissolved oxygen. Increasing the DO in your nutrient solution will benefit the root system and be detrimental to harmful anaerobic bacteria such as pythium.

Many disease-causing organisms and spores are killed by the free O- atom. The free Oxygen atom will destroy dead organic material (i.e., leaves and roots) in the system, preventing them from rotting and spreading diseases. H2O2 will help eliminate existing infections and will help prevent future ones. It is also useful for suppressing algae growth.

Over Watering

Both soil and hydroponic plants often fall prey to the same syndrome. Hydroponic crops often fail due to "root rot" and soil crops succumb to "over-watering." The actual cause is a shortage of Oxygen at the root zone, allowing a Pythium infection to take hold.

In a soil system, the soil consists of particles, a film of water on the particles and air spaces between the particles. When too much water is put into the soil, the air spaces fill with liquid. The roots will quickly use up the dissolved oxygen within these pore spaces. If the root system has not absorbed the water within these pore spaces, air will not be able to enter and Oxygen within that space will become depleted. In a low oxygen environment, roots will begin dying within twenty-four hours.

As the roots die, the plant’s ability to uptake water and nutrients will drastically decrease, and the plant will show symptoms of nutrient deficiencies (pale leaves, and slow growth). Plants will start to wilt (appearing water deficient) – at this point many growers will mistakenly water their plants!

In a Hydroponic system, oxygen deprivation is often caused by high temperatures and inadequate nutrient circulation and/or aeration. High reservoir temperatures interfere with Oxygen's ability to dissolve into water. Temperatures above 70F (20C) will eventually cause problems, 62F-65F (16C-18C) is recommended.

Oxygen deprivation symptoms in hydroponics are similar to that of soil - but at least you are able to check the roots. Healthy roots should be mostly white with maybe a slight yellowish tan tinge. If they are a brownish color with dead tips or they easily pull away there is at least the beginning of a serious problem. An organic, ‘dirt like’ rotting smell means there is already a very good chance it is too late. As roots die and rot, they remove Oxygen out of the water; as Oxygen levels are depleted even further. more will roots die - a viscous circle!. Reduced Oxygen levels and high temperatures encourage anaerobic bacteria and fungi, which attack the plant further mercilessly.

How does Hydrogen Peroxide prevent root rot & over-watering?

Plants watered with H2O2 will experience extra oxygen in the root zone when the peroxide breaks down. This helps stop the Oxygen from being depleted in the water filled air spaces until air can get back into them. High Oxygen levels at the roots will encourage rapid healthy root growth. In a Hydroponic systems, H2O2 will disperse through out the system and raise Oxygen levels as it breaks down. Strong white healthy roots with lots of fuzzy new growth will be visible. This fuzzy growth has massive surface area allowing for rapid absorption of the huge amounts of water and nutrients needed for rapid top growth. A healthy plant starts with a healthy root system.

How to use/apply it

Posted Image Posted Image

H2O2 comes in several different strengths: 3%, 5%, 8% and 35%, also sold as food grade Hydrogen Peroxide. The most economical is 35% which we recommend be diluted to three percent before using. When working with food grade H2O2, it is very important that you clean up any spills or splashes immediately, it will damage almost oxidize everything very quickly. Skin will be temporarily bleached pure white if not washed cleaned. Gloves are strongly recommended when working with any strong chemical.

Food grade H2O2 can be diluted to three percent by mixing it one part to eleven parts water (preferably distilled). The storage container should be opaque to prevent light from getting in and it must be able to hold some pressure. If three-liter pop bottles are available in your area they are ideal for mixing and storing H2O2. There are twelve quarter liters (250ml) in three liters, if you put in one quarter liter H2O2 and eleven quarter liters (250ml) water in the bottle it will full of three percent H2O2 and the bottle can hold the pressure that the H2O2 will generate.

Three percent Hydrogen Peroxide may be added at up to 3 ml's per liter (2 1\2 tsp. per gallon), but it is recommended that you start at a lower concentration and increase to full strength over a few weeks.

For hydroponic applications, use every reservoir change and replace twenty-five percent (one quarter) every day. Example: In a 100L (25gal) reservoir you would add three hundred ml's (3%) H2O2 when changing the nutrient. You would then add seventy-five ml's more every day.

[Editor’s note: high concentrations of H2o2 can be detrimental to organic additives (such as beneficial additives) and organic nutrient mixtures.]

Application:

US Standard
1.28*G/C= Liquid Oz's per day

Metric
10*L/C= Ml per day

Where;
C= % concentration of H2O2
L= Number of liters in reservoir
G= Number of Gallons in reservoir

Example: How much 3% H202 should I add to 7 gallons of nutes?
1.28*7/3=2.986 Oz's each day.

Where to get it

35% food grade is called “food grade” because it has no toxic impurities. Of course your local hydroponics retailer or web stores have it (there may be shipping restrictions on high strength peroxides). The local feed supplier may have it in small towns. Prices range from fifteen dollars per quarter liter to eighty dollars a gallon. One gallon will treat up to fifty thousand liters of water.

3%5%, 8% Can be found at most drugstores or pharmacies, prices start at a less than a dollar for a one hundred-ml bottle that will treat one hundred liters.

What to do if you already have root rot

Posted Image

In Soil:

Use peroxide water with an anti-fungicide and a high Phosphate fertilizer (9-45-15, 10-52-10, 0-60-0) for additional root growth. Or any other product with rooting hormone dissolved in it is helpful in re-growing roots and is strongly recommended. Water heavily until liquid pours out the bottom of the pot – this method helps flush out stagnant dead water and replaces it with fresh highly oxygenated water. Don't let plants sit in trays full of water, the soil will absorb this water and stay too wet. Don't water again until the pot feels light and the top inch or two of the soil are dry.

In Hydroponics:


Change your nutrients. Add H2O2 to the system. This will add oxygen and chemically eat dead roots. If roots are badly rotted and can be pulled away by hand, you should cut them off. They are already dead and will only rot, causing further problems. Add a fungicide to kill any fungus that is probably present in the rotted tissue to prevent it from spreading. Increase aeration of the reservoir – add air pumps and stones. An air stone under every plant is usually very effective, but will require a larger air pump. Decrease the reservoir temperature, oxygen dissolves better in cold water and disease causing organisms reproduce slower as well. A good temperate range is 62F to 65F; anything above 70F will eventually cause a problem. It is also a good idea to remove any wilting plants from the system and put them on a separate reservoir so they don't infect plants that are still healthy.

Summary

The key to productive plants is a healthy root system; Hydrogen Peroxide is a great way to keep your roots healthy. It is a must to ensure the biggest best crops possible and to increase the chances of your plants thriving to harvest. Peroxide users will rarely lose plants or crops to root disease and will harvest larger and more consistent crops.

#2
SmokinFatJay

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I just want to add that any body using the high percentage Hydrogen Peroxide like the 35% food grade kind. Should be aware that it is highly flammable and to keep it away from heat and flames. Don't store it next to your ballast or lights! Like on the top shelf in your grow closet. Be safe! It is good stuff though.

#3
Caribbean

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I just want to add that any body using the high percentage Hydrogen Peroxide like the 35% food grade kind. Should be aware that it is highly flammable and to keep it away from heat and flames. Don't store it next to your ballast or lights! Like on the top shelf in your grow closet. Be safe! It is good stuff though.



Very good point. Don't smoke a joint while messing with that stuff. Best bet is to buy the cheap stuff from the drug store. That's what I use. I tried the 35% stuff, but didn't feel safe when using it. I add a ounce or sot of 3% every 4th time I water.

#4
TANKJR

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Good Info! Thanks for posting this! I feel like this will be a sticky somewhere before all is said and done! +rep bro!

I usually just use the drug store stuff when cloning. Works good tho!

#5
Joescool00

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I use it if i ever see a slight browning or think there might be a start of an infection. A bottle is a dollar and i just dump a few cups through the net pot to make sure it covers the roots and let it drain into the res. A hole bottle of 3% dose the trick in my 30 gallon 4 plant rdwc. Super cheap and very effective hope others are more willing to give it a try.

Joe

#6
IMO

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i think ill pass on pouring hydrogen peroxide on my soil...

#7
Joescool00

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in soil its more of a last resort. and also used to cure overwatering if it happens. your trying to keep a healthy culture so you dont really want to go and kill everything. as long as your using something with a good amount of active culture your not usually going to deal with to much infection.

#8
IMO

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i think the OP may want to note that h2o2 should not be used on organic soil...
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#9
BingoBob

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i think the OP may want to note that h2o2 should not be used on organic soil...


It'll kill good bacteria & fungus in soil that actually benefit your plant. Also wouldn't recommend using H2O2 if you are using Great White or Mykos in your hydro.

#10
IMO

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It'll kill good bacteria & fungus in soil that actually benefit your plant. Also wouldn't recommend using H2O2 if you are using Great White or Mykos in your hydro.


ding ding ding. i don't know about the microherd in hydro, but in my soil theyd be absolutely miffed - not to mention dead. never mix h2o2 with organic.

#11
BingoBob

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ding ding ding. i don't know about the microherd in hydro, but in my soil theyd be absolutely miffed - not to mention dead. never mix h2o2 with organic.


May also be wise to use Great White or Mykos in your hydro to help w/ root rot. You'd get more out of it as well compared to H2O2.

#12
GrapeStreet

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Rain contains trace ammounts of H2O2, a result of the reaction of H2O falling through Ozone (O3) on it's way to the surface.

"Organic" nature uses it in small amounts.

#13
IMO

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Rain contains trace ammounts of H2O2, a result of the reaction of H2O falling through Ozone (O3) on it's way to the surface.

"Organic" nature uses it in small amounts.



so i should be using h2o2 on my organic[carbon based, living, microherd, whatever it is you'd like to qualify it as] soil?

#14
GrapeStreet

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In very very small amounts....and only if it's necessary.

The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration of rainwater falling in Claremont, California has been measured over a series of precipitation events. The H2O2 concentrations were typically 1–160 ppb, but on three occasions H2O2 levels in excess of 1 ppm were measured. The H2O2 levels generally decrease with time during the storms. The measured values of H2O2 are lower than those which are predicted from the uptake of gas phase H2O2 into clouds.



Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) which was first used in 1923 by G.W. Robinson to destroy soil organic matter, is the most widely used chemical reagent for removing OM in soil laboratories worldwide. However, there have been some scientific reports indicating that it may not be a good reagent for that purpose due to some unwanted effects on the mineral soil particles.


Several natural remedies may be employed by organic farmers for foliar disease management. These include a wide range of products and practices including: compost watery extracts; hydrogen peroxide; sodium bicarbonate; foliar fertilizers; plant extracts (fermented nettle tea, equisetum tea, comfrey tea); and biostimulants (seaweed, humates). The precise mode of action for many of these materials remains to be discovered.

Of these, compost watery extracts and hydrogen peroxide look promising for the control of tomato diseases like early blight. Compost extracts have proven effective for several vegetable diseases, including late blight of tomatoes.(51) See the ATTRA publication Notes on Compost Teas for references and resources.

Little information is available on the use and efficacy of hydrogen peroxide. Growers in New Jersey are using 35% hydrogen peroxide and diluting it to a 0.5%-1% foliar spray solution, though lower rates are also common. Rates of 2% and 4% are being used as a post-harvest wash. A 1% solution is equivalent to 3.7 oz in 124.3 oz of water, while a 0.5% solution is equivalent to 1.8 oz in 126.2 oz of water.(52)

Rosen, Emily Brown. 1995. Dilution Rates for Hydrogen Peroxide. Northeast Organic Farmers Association–New Jersey. 1 p.


Sprouting Seeds: Add 1 ounce of 3% Hydrogen Peroxide into 1 pint of water and soak the seeds overnight. Add the SAME amount of Hydrogen Peroxide when you rinse the seeds. (Some people have reported 3/4 inch Sprouts in 24 hours!)
Plants & Flowers: Add 1 oz. of 3% Hydrogen Peroxide in 1 quart of water to water or mist plants. (This will enhance the growing environment)
Insecticide Spray: Add 8 ounces white sugar and 4 – 8 ounces 3% Hydrogen Peroxide to 1 gallon of water.


http://www.waset.org.../v2/v2-3-27.pdf

aaannnd...

The rates and mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) decomposition were examined in a series of soil suspensions at H2O2 concentrations comparable to those found in rainwaters. The formation of hydroxyl radical (OH) as a possible decomposition intermediate was investigated using a new, highly sensitive method. In surface soils with higher organic matter or manganese content, H2O2 usually decayed rapidly, with disproportionation to water and dioxygen dominating the decomposition, whereas the formation of the hydroxyl radical (OH) represented <10% of the total H2O2 decomposed. In contrast, for soils with lower organic matter content, H2O2 usually decayed much more slowly, but OH was a major product of the H2O2 decomposed. The decomposition was principally associated with soil particles, not the soil supernatant. Different sterilization techniques indicated that decomposition of H2O2 was at least partly due to biological activity. Because the loss of H2O2 can largely be accommodated by the production of O2 and OH within these soils, our results suggest that disproportionation through a catalase-type mechanism and the production of OH through a Haber-Weiss mechanism represent the principal routes through which H2O2 is lost.


Hydrogen Peroxide and Horticulture
By Bryce Fredrickson



Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) is a clear sharp smelling substance very similar in appearance to water (H2O). Like water it is made up of Hydrogen (H2) and Oxygen (O2), however H2O2 has an extra Oxygen atom in an unstable arrangement. It is this extra atom that gives H2O2 its useful properties. H2O2 has been used for many purposes including cleaning, bleaching, sterilizing, rocket fuel, animal feed treatment and in addition many miraculous claims about its health benefits have been made. This article isn't about any of these; instead it will concentrate on horticultural applications. H2O2 is of great use for both hydroponics and dirt/soilless gardening.

What Does Hydrogen Peroxide do?
H2O2 is an unstable molecule, when it breaks down a single oxygen atom and a molecule of water is released. This oxygen atom is extremely reactive and will attach itself to either another O- atom forming a stable Oxygen molecule or attack a nearby organic molecule. Both the stable and O- forms will increase the level of dissolved oxygen. This is the method by which H2O2 is beneficial. Pre treating the water supply with H2O2will drive out the Chlorine many cities use to sterilize it. This will also degrade any pesticides or herbicides that might be present as well as any other organic matter. Well water can be high in methane and organic sulfates, both of which H2O2 will remove. Many disease causing organisms and spores are killed by Oxygen, the free Oxygen H2O2 releases is extremely effective at this. H2O2 will help eliminate existing infections and will help prevent future ones. It is also useful for suppressing algae growth. The free Oxygen atom will destroy dead organic material (i.e, leaves roots) in the system preventing them from rotting and spreading diseases.

Over Watering
Roots require Oxygen to breathe and low levels are the main cause of almost all root diseases. Both soil and hydroponic plants often fall prey to the same syndrome although it is rarely recognized as what it really is. Hydroponic crops often fail due to "root rot" and soil crops succumb to "over watering." The real cause of both these problems is a shortage of Oxygen at the root zone. In a soil system the soil consists of particles, a film of water on the particles and air spaces between the particles. When too much water is put into the soil the air spaces fill with liquid. The roots will quickly use up what Oxygen is dissolved in the water, if they haven't drunk enough of the liquid to allow air back in to the soil spaces they will stop working. In this situation roots will start dying within twenty-four hours. As the roots die the plants ability to drink water and nutrients will decrease, this will cause symptoms of nutrient deficiencies (mostly pale, slow, weak growth), and strangely they will start to wilt like they don't have enough water. It is easy to make a fatal mistake at this point and add more water.

In a Hydroponic system the cause is a more direct simple lack of oxygen in the solution; this may be from inadequate circulation and/or aeration. High reservoir temperatures also interfere with Oxygen's ability to dissolve in the water. Temperatures above 70F (20C) will eventually cause problems, 62F-65F (16C-18C) is recommended. The same symptoms will appear as with soil plants but you can also check the roots. Healthy roots should be mostly white with maybe a slight yellowish tan tinge. If they are a brownish color with dead tips or they easily pull away there is at least the beginning of a serious problem. An organic, ‘dirt like’ rotting smell means there is already a very good chance it is too late. As roots die and rot they eat Oxygen out of the water, as Oxygen levels are even further depleted more roots die, a viscous circle may be well under way. Reduced Oxygen levels and high temperatures both encourage anaerobic bacteria and fungi. The plants may still be saved but you will have to work fast.

How Hydrogen Peroxide prevents root rot/over watering.
When plants are watered with H2O2 it will break down and release Oxygen into the area around the roots. This helps stop the Oxygen from being depleted in the water filled air spaces until air can get back into them. High Oxygen levels at the roots will encourage rapid healthy root growth. In a Hydroponic system H2O2 will disperse through out the system and raise Oxygen levels as it breaks down. Strong white healthy roots with lots of fuzzy new growth will be visible. This fuzzy growth has massive surface area allowing for rapid absorption of the huge amounts of water and nutrients needed for rapid top growth. A healthy plant starts with a healthy root system.

How to use it.
H2O2 comes in several different strengths 3%, 5%, 8% and 35%, also sold as food grade Hydrogen Peroxide. The most economical is 35% which we recommend be diluted to three percent before using, as at this high concentration it can cause damage to skin and clothing. When working with food grade H2O2 it is very important that you clean up any spills or splashes immediately, it will damage almost anything very quickly. This is extra important with skin and clothing. Skin will be temporarily bleached pure white if not washed cleaned. Gloves are strongly recommended when working with any strong chemical.

Food grade H2O2 can be diluted to three percent by mixing it one part to eleven parts water (preferably distilled). The storage container should be opaque to prevent light from getting in and it must be able to hold some pressure. If three-liter pop bottles are available in your area they are ideal for mixing and storing H2O2. There are twelve quarter liters (250ml) in three liters, if you put in one quarter liter H2O2 and eleven quarter liters (250ml) water in the bottle it will full of three percent H2O2 and the bottle can hold the pressure that the H2O2 will generate. Three percent Hydrogen Peroxide may be added at up to three ml's per liter (2 1\2 tsp. Per gallon), but it is recommended that you start at a lower concentration and increase to full strength over a few weeks. Use every watering even on fresh cuttings. For hydroponics use every reservoir change and replace twenty-five percent (one quarter) every day. Example: In a 100L reservoir you would add three hundred ml's (3%) H2O2when changing the nutrient. You would then add seventy-five ml's more every day.

Where to get it.
35% food grade: called food grade because it has no toxic impurities. Of course your local hydroponics retailer, whom you can locate over the web.(there may be shipping restrictions on high strength peroxides). The local feed supplier may have it in small towns. Prices range from fifteen dollars per quarter liter to eighty dollars a gallon. One gallon will treat up to fifty thousand liters of water.

3%5%, 8% Can be found at most drugstores or pharmacies, prices start at a less than a dollar for a one hundred-ml bottle that will treat one hundred liters.

What to do if you already have root rot.

In Dirt:
Use peroxide water with an anti-fungicide and a high Phosphate fertilizer (9-45-15, 10-52-10, 0-60-0) for root growth. Or any other product with rooting hormone dissolved in it is helpful in regrowing roots and is strongly recommended. Water heavily until liquid pours out the bottom of the pot. This sound like bad idea, but it flushes out stagnant dead water and replaces it with fresh highly oxygenated water. Don't let plants sit in trays full of water, the soil will absorb this water and stay too wet. Don't water again until the pot feels light and the top inch or two of the soil are dry.

In Hydro:
Change your nutrients. Add H2O2 to the system. This will add oxygen and chemically eat dead roots. If roots are badly rotted and can be pulled away by hand you should pull them off. They are already dead and will only rot, causing further problems. Add a fungicide to kill any fungus that is probably present in the rotted tissue to prevent it from spreading. Increase aeration of the water, get an air pump and air stones, or more of them, for the reservoir. An air stone under every plant is usually very effective, but will require a larger air pump. Models that will do from forty to four hundred stones are available. Decrease the reservoir temperature, oxygen dissolves better in cold water and disease causing organisms reproduce slower as well. A good temperate range is 62F to 65F; anything above 70F will eventually cause a problem. It is also a good idea to remove any wilty plants from the system and put them on a separate reservoir so they don't infect plants that are still healthy.

Summary
The key to big productive plants is a big healthy root system and Hydrogen Peroxide is a great way to keep your roots healthy. It is a must to ensure the biggest best crops possible and to increase the chances of your plants thriving to harvest. Peroxide users will rarely lose plants or crops to root disease and will harvest larger and more consistent crops.


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#15
IMO

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In very very small amounts....and only if it's necessary.










http://www.waset.org.../v2/v2-3-27.pdf

aaannnd...


well you can use it, ill stick to just making soil with enough oxygen to begin with.

#16
Tseung

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From experience...H2O2 works great for hydroponic root rot as long as it stays in the reservoir for only a little bit but to me it sounds risky using it on a soil based medium...because when I used H2O2 for my application I first put 2 tsp diluted in a quart of ph tested water and added it to my six gallon reservoir and it was working like a charm until I made the huge mistake of adding some over my rockwool/hydroton rock growing medium...once I did that it's like it instantly drained the plants and they went from being perfect to instantly going limp within a minute.

#17
Love420247

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Hydrogen Peroxide is also supposed to kill fungus gnat larvae when added to the water

Obviously only an option if you are NOT growing organically

#18
Shyheim13

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I use it if i ever see a slight browning or think there might be a start of an infection. A bottle is a dollar and i just dump a few cups through the net pot to make sure it covers the roots and let it drain into the res. A hole bottle of 3% dose the trick in my 30 gallon 4 plant rdwc. Super cheap and very effective hope others are more willing to give it a try.

Joe

thanks man

#19
Dcowboys909

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Roots require Oxygen to breathe and low levels are the main cause of almost all root diseases. Both soil and hydroponic plants often fall prey to the same syndrome although it is rarely recognized as what it really is. Hydroponic crops often fail due to "root rot" and soil crops succumb to "over watering." The real cause of both these problems is a shortage of Oxygen at the root zone. In a soil system the soil consists of particles, a film of water on the particles and air spaces between the particles. When too much water is put into the soil the air spaces fill with liquid. The roots will quickly use up what Oxygen is dissolved in the water, if they haven't drunk enough of the liquid to allow air back in to the soil spaces they will stop working. In this situation roots will start dying within twenty-four hours. As the roots die the plants ability to drink water and nutrients will decrease, this will cause symptoms of nutrient deficiencies (mostly pale, slow, weak growth), and strangely they will start to wilt like they don't have enough water. It is easy to make a fatal mistake at this point and add more water.


So say my plants are overwatered should I skip a feeding and use the hydrogen water instead? Or mix peroxide in?? Or say I just watered and fed should I dry them out a week and give hydrogen water?

#20
Dcowboys909

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I'm using general hydro A+B and cal-mag also bloom boost, diamond nectar and molasses. Will this affect it at all if I used it??


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