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Wheat Germ?

  • by DokiDoki
  • Sep 11 2010 10:32 PM
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Posted 11 September 2010 - 10:32 PM

I'm looking for an organic source of cysteine. Cysteine and sulfur is the base for creating skunky smelling thiols. I am already adding a natural sulfur ingredient, but would like to find natural cysteine. The only fertilizer I can find it in is Bud Candy and Hydroplex, both of which are not organic.

In reading about cysteine, I found that wheat germ has high doses of it. Which makes me wonder... can I use it in my soil mixture or as a fertilizer additive? Or does anyone know a better source for cysteine?
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Posted 13 September 2010 - 04:37 AM

I'm looking for an organic source of cysteine. Cysteine and sulfur is the base for creating skunky smelling thiols. I am already adding a natural sulfur ingredient, but would like to find natural cysteine. The only fertilizer I can find it in is Bud Candy and Hydroplex, both of which are not organic.

In reading about cysteine, I found that wheat germ has high doses of it. Which makes me wonder... can I use it in my soil mixture or as a fertilizer additive? Or does anyone know a better source for cysteine?

Ahem.............

Did this information come from FatBoy Mike at Advanced Nutrients by any chance? I'm literally stunned that anyone could/would state that a protein found in pork sausage (as well as wheat, yogurt, and a slew of other sources including Oscar Meyer Bologna) would promote olfactory qualities in a plant's flowers.

An interesting concept to be sure. I'm sorry I missed the party when Mike and his crew came up with this one. Must have been some serious partying going on - obviously.

Organic cysteine is in every health food store but you need the name used in that industry, i.e. L-Cysteine (a non-essential amino acid).

Have fun!

LD

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Posted 13 September 2010 - 07:53 PM

No, this is a hair-brained idea I had from doing research on thiols and thiol production in plants. I am looking to boost the thiol production to make extra stinky herbs. :)

From Wikipedia "Thiols" entry (Thiol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Cysteine and cystine
As the functional group of the amino acid cysteine, the thiol group plays an important role in biology. When the thiol groups of two cysteine residues (as in monomers or constituent units) are brought near each other in the course of protein folding, an oxidation reaction can generate a cystine unit with a disulfide bond (-S-S-). Disulfide bonds can contribute to a protein's tertiary structure if the cysteines are part of the same peptide chain, or contribute to the quaternary structure of multi-unit proteins by forming fairly strong covalent bonds between different peptide chains.


From Wikipedia "Sulfur Assimilation" entry (Sulfur assimilation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Sulfate taken up by the roots is the major sulfur source for growth, though it has to be reduced to sulfide before it is further metabolized. Root plastids contain all sulfate reduction enzymes, however, the reduction of sulfate to sulfide and its subsequent incorporation into cysteine takes predominantly place in the shoot in the chloroplast. Cysteine is the precursor or reduced sulfur donor of most other organic sulfur compounds in plants. The predominant proportion of the organic sulfur is present in the protein fraction (up to 70 % of total sulfur), as cysteine and methionine residues. Cysteine and methionine are highly significant in the structure, conformation and function of proteins. Plants contain a large variety of other organic sulfur compounds, as thiols (glutathione), sulfolipids and secondary sulfur compounds (alliins, glucosinolates, phytochelatins), which play an important role in physiology and protection against environmental stress and pests. Sulfur compounds are also of great importance for food quality and for the production of phyto-pharmaceutics. Sulfur deficiency will result in the loss of plant production, fitness and resistance to environmental stress and pests.


"Molecular Basis of Cysteine Biosynthesis in Plants" by Donald Danforth Plant Science Center (http://www.jbc.org/c.../46/38803.short)

In plants, cysteine biosynthesis plays a central role in fixing inorganic sulfur from the environment and provides the only metabolic sulfide donor for the generation of methionine, glutathione, phytochelatins, iron-sulfur clusters, vitamin cofactors, and multiple secondary metabolites

Edited by DokiDoki, 13 September 2010 - 09:40 PM.
added another quote


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Posted 13 September 2010 - 07:55 PM

I have also heard that human hair is primarily made out of cysteine. I'm thinking that may be a good source, but looks like it needs hydrolysis to break it free into a usable form.

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 01:51 AM

bump. any more word on wheat germ?



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